Growing in God: Growing in love and living water

Naro Moro waterfalls by Laurie-Ann Zachar Copple

My name is Laurie-Ann, and I’m a missionary. During my mission travels, I have ministered with people in Northern Ireland, Pakistan, Canada and the USA.  I’ve also ministered in African countries like Kenya, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, South Africa and Botswana. But at this time, we live in the beautiful Western Cape of South Africa.

During our last four articles, we learned of many of the ways God guides us – through commanding scripture, compelling spirit, dreams, visions, angels, common sense, godly counsel and circumstantial signs.  I had so many stories to share; both ours and those of others.  I am sure that you have a few stories to share of your own.  I’d love to hear them via the comment box on our website, Http://www.coppleswestern cape.ca.

I was going to venture further into how to hear the voice of God, but I was interrupted by a prompting from Holy Spirit.  It’s good to listen to what he wants to say – since it’s timely in a NOW sort of way.  I am to share about growing in love.

Our Iris mama Heidi Baker is an apostle of love.  Her husband Rolland is an apostle of joy.  They often say “Love LOOKS like something.”  That love includes noticing people and stopping to listen to them.  It includes ministering to them with the love that the Holy Spirit fills you with for these moments. These moments are divine appointments, where God puts a person for Heidi, or us to bless; one by one.  Heidi gives advice on how to start ministry in the Compelling Love movie, by sharing, “It’s not complicated, just stop for the one.”    That love shared has a different flavour and package in each place, and each culture.  Love is powerful and shows through your whole being – but love in action is very specific.

Love in the Worcester township of Avian Park looks different than it does in Camp’s Bay near Cape Town.  Love in a First nations reserve in northern Ontario looks different than it would in downtown Toronto, or in Jo’burg.  Love looks different with Robertson farm kids than with seniors from Hermanus.  What are the needs around you?  Do you feel compelled towards acts of service?  That’s one love language that we’ll share about later.

Sometimes love looks like a hug and a listening ear – so the person no longer feels invisible, but rather valued, heard and seen.  Sometimes love means a sandwich, fruit and juice to a hungry South African child.  Do you notice that these ways of showing love are ACTIVE?  They require action – which means to love is not to just sit there and feel sorry for people.  That’s pity, not love.

As humans, we communicate by language – not just English, Afrikaans, Xhosa, Zulu and more.  Our words are only part of the story.  Most communication happens non-verbally – and love is expressed here very strongly.  We also speak in other ways than words and cues.  These would be called orientations, or would be best known as “love languages.”  These are personal ways that we best receive and give love.  Everyone has at least one love language, and it is easy to love others within your own way of sharing.

Some people receive more in certain areas than others.  If you’re married, find out your spouse’s love language.  It may be different than yours.  It’s definitely easier to love in your own language, but your spouse won’t really receive that love deeply.  They won’t FEEL loved. If you really want your significant other to receive your love, love them the way they can receive it.  Learn their love language.  Gary Chapman wrote an excellent book on love languages that you can read, called “The Five Love Languages.”

Here are the five love languages:  Number 1 is Words of Affirmation, which includes encouragement and the words “I love you.” Basically this is verbal encouragement. Number 2 is Acts of Service, which can include serving tea with a biscuit, fixing broken things, and so much more. Number 3 is Receiving Gifts. These could be chocolates, flowers, mementoes, box of tea or anything meaningful. It doesn’t have to be a big gift.  Homemade love notes could be part of this gift.  Number 4 is Quality Time spent together. This is an important way to receive love when you spend a lot of time ministering or serving others.  You need time with each other.  We especially need our quality time with God. I wouldn’t be surprised if that’s one of Jesus’ love languages.  He needed his time with the Father, and we also need time with him, even if we don’t realize it.  When you create a space for quality time, you are creating a container that can be filled with all kinds of love.  And the 5th love language is Physical Touch.  This includes holding hands, hugs, kisses, and even just a touch on the shoulder. This form of love makes you feel grounded, IF you are not claustrophobically clingy.  I find that the children we teach in MasterPeace Academy receive love by hugs and kisses on the cheek, as well as verbal encouragement.  Unfortunately in Canadian schools, this is frowned upon, since some teachers in the past have abused their authority. How unfortunate for those who have been abused and those who desperately need a kind, loving, appropriate touch.

We shared about love languages with our My Father’s House teens, and surprisingly most of them said that one of their two love languages was quality time, although acts of service was also high on the list.

While these ways of sharing love are a blessing to both give and receive, each of us has two primary ways where we really receive and feel loved.  Mine happens to be Acts of Service, where Tony might help me proofread a devotional, give input on ministry, or bring me a cup of tea).  I also receive words of affirmation – being encouraged, as well as told that I am loved and appreciated.  Tony’s major love languages are words of affirmation and physical touch.  We hold hands all the time, and when we sit together, he has his hand on my arm, shoulder or back.  I know that while he appreciates quality time, acts of service and some gifts, he really feels satisfied when I encourage him and give him the touch he so needs.

I found a meme on Facebook that illustrated the five love languages in the form of Mexican burritos.  This is a delicious food make of meat, vegetables, cheese and spice, wrapped in a soft corn tortilla.

Words of affirmation is shared as “This is a good burrito.”  Acts of Service came across as “I made you a burrito.”  Receiving Gifts is  “Here’s a burrito.”  Quality time was shown as “Let’s go out for burritos together.” And Physical touch was sweet on hugs, when it shared, “Let me hold you and wrap my arms around you like a burrito.”  Can you imagine these languages acted out with your friends and family?  Can you bless your spouse this way?

There are also different kinds of love, since there are different relationships.  Most are shown in the Bible, such as the friendship between Jonathan and David, the loyalty between Ruth and Naomi, and especially the love of Jesus for all he encountered.  Eros is romantic love, which was named after the Greek god of love and sexual desire. Eros is also called “Cupid,” a figure often shown on Valentine’s Day cards. Phileo is brotherly love, or friendship.  The American city of Philadelphia was named as the city of brotherly love.  Storge is family love, particularly the love a parent or guardian feels for their children.  This is what Tony and I naturally feel for the children and teens that we work with. However, our love in action is steeped in far more than natural affection.  Then there are less known loves such as ludus, or playful love; pragma or long-standing love, and philautia, love of self.

The deepest love is agape, the love of God.  This is the only kind of love that is perfect.  When God pours out his love, it transforms us.  Listen to Romans 5:5 NIV: “And hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit, who has been given to us.  His love empowers all the other loves we may feel and express. The agape love of God is active and can’t help but change our hearts for the better. He transforms us.

Since we are studying love, the best place to see it in action is in the famous ‘love chapter’:  1 Corinthians 13.  This chapter is in between the stern warnings, pleadings and teachings of discipline in the midst of using spiritual gifts – in a loving, and unselfish way.  Spiritual gifts are actually not for the benefit of ourselves, but of others both in the church and outside of it.  Everything in our lives needs to be done in the CONTEXT of love.   Love is personal, and it is relational.  Most aspects of our lives are relational, whether in a work and business environment, family, friends, church, ministry and people we meet who have similar interests.

Close your eyes if it is safe to do so, as you listen to my voice.     Then imagine yourself by substituting your name in the place of where Paul says love.  You’ll see what I mean shortly.

Here’s 1 Corinthians 13:1-3.  This sets up the stage for the chapter. “If I could speak all the languages of earth and of angels, but didn’t love others, I would only be a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal.  If I had the gift of prophecy, and if I understood all of God’s secret plans and possessed all knowledge, and if I had such faith that I could move mountains, but didn’t love others, I would be nothing.  If I gave everything I have to the poor and even sacrificed my body, I could boast about it; but if I didn’t love others, I would have gained nothing.”

This shows love as the motivating force behind all we do.  If perfect love is our motive, we do not fail.   The next verses are where you personalize the scripture.

“Love is patient and kind. Love is not jealous or boastful or proud or rude.”  Laurie-Ann is patient and kind.  Laurie-Ann is not jealous, boastful, proud or rude.

“Love does not demand its own way. Love is not irritable, and love keeps no record of being wronged.” Laurie-Ann does not demand her own way.  Laurie-Ann is not irritable, and she keeps no record of being wronged.

“Love does not rejoice about injustice but rejoices whenever the truth wins out.”  Laurie-Ann does not rejoice about injustice but she rejoices whenever the truth wins out.

“Love never gives up, never loses faith, is always hopeful, and endures through every circumstance.”  Laurie-Ann never gives up, never loses faith, she is always hopeful, and endures through every circumstance.

Wow.  I feel convicted.  Can you do this?  Can I do this?  NO, not even close.  We can only express love that way when God’s love fills us completely.  This is not just a once and a while filling of love.  We need this love all the time, like living water flowing out of us.  This means we need continually to drink of it and be in God’s presence as much as we can.

Here’s the rest of the chapter, which puts love as the foundation for everything in our lives:  Prophecy and speaking in unknown languages and special knowledge will become useless. But love will last forever Now our knowledge is partial and incomplete, and even the gift of prophecy reveals only part of the whole picture!  But when the time of perfection comes, these partial things will become useless.

When I was a child, I spoke and thought and reasoned as a child. But when I grew up, I put away childish things.  Now we see things imperfectly, like puzzling reflections in a mirror, but then we will see everything with perfect clarity. All that I know now is partial and incomplete, but then I will know everything completely, just as God now knows me completely.  Three things will last forever—faith, hope, and love—and the greatest of these is love.”

I’m so thankful that the apostle Paul wrote these words of wisdom.  We can’t survive without love, and we were meant to live in love.  Please take these words to heart and think about how you receive love best in your love language.  Also learn the way that those around you best receive love.

But first, go receive the love of God for yourself.  He loves you so.  We are dry, thirsty vessels without the living water of love within us.  That living water is the Holy Spirit.  That is the same love that the Apostle Paul says is poured out in our hearts.  In John 7:38, Jesus himself shouted to the crowds during a Jewish festival. He said, “Anyone who is thirsty may come to me! Anyone who believes in me may come and drink! For the Scriptures declare, ‘Rivers of living water will flow from his heart.”   Jesus gives us this invitation too.

Lord, thank you for your invitation to receive living water from you.  I say “Yes, please fill me.  We are so thirsty, Lord.”  I ask that you will soak the hearts of those listening, so that they receive your love – as much as they think they can receive, and yet more.  Show us your love in the ways we need it most.  Your love goes beyond the five love languages, but you also express yourself in those ways through your people.  Help us to express your love to those around us.  We can only do this with your love, Lord.  Thank you for your love for us, the love that goes on and on. In Jesus’ name. Amen.

If you enjoyed this message, and would like to hear an audio version, visit the Ways to Grow in God podcast page at coppleswesterncape.ca (WTIGIG podcast page)   then scroll down to #48. May this bless you.

If you are able and willing, and would like to contribute to L-A’s life-saving chemotherapy treatments (that she is receiving in Cape Town, South Africa), please visit the medical campaign page, on how you can give by Paypal or other methods.  Thank you and may God deeply bless you.

Laurie-Ann Copple

Growing in God: How to receive honour (Honour pt. 3)

This picture is more about dishonour, but we need to know what blocks us receiving honour before we can receive it. So we do not wish shame on you, but rather than you receive honour when it is due.  Please read and be blessed.

My name is Laurie-Ann, and I’m a missionary. During my mission travels, I have ministered with people in Northern Ireland, Pakistan, Canada and the USA.  I’ve also ministered in African countries like Kenya, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, South Africa and Botswana. But at this time, we live in the beautiful Western Cape of South Africa.

Two articles ago, we learned of the importance of developing a culture of honour.  This means intentionally choosing to honour God, leaders, widows, the vulnerable and everyone we are connected with.  In earlier teachings we learned about encouragement and blessing – honour is a big part of that.  It’s in choosing to see the potential – the hidden gold inside a person and drawing it out of them.  Relationships grow stronger and full of healing when honour is involved.  When we honour and really listen to people, it opens up a relationship to blossom. When we do this with God, it’s incredibly special.   Imagine what would happen if we honour and really listen to our spouse!  No more nagging.  No more need to shut out nagging with half-closed ears. Honour validates.  Dishonour… well, it basically feels like a curse.  That is especially the case with the commandment of honouring your parents.  If you don’t, your life won’t be blessed, or even long-lived.

Then in our last article, we learned how to give honour – to God through an everyday lifestyle of worship, offerings, keeping truth, integrity, obedience and finding different ways of honouring others.  Some receive through gifts, others by celebrations, preferring them and being there for them. There are so many ways.  But first, we need to look at what blocks us from receiving honour.  If we don’t realize it, we can become our own worst enemy.

Seven Blocks to us receiving honour:

One: Offense is a major road block on the highway of honour.  I mentioned during the last broadcast about a personal experience with a former friend.  This lady was a Japanese pastor, and she was deeply offended by my momentary lapse of forgetting to take off my shoes in her home. She never forgave me, despite my quick repentance.  She showed me dishonour by cutting off the friendship, and from there on, there was no honour coming from her.  Her offense became a wall between us, and while it hurt me, I know it hurt her as well. Offense can be obvious, or hidden in your heart.  Either way, it causes deep rejection in relationships that can that can go much further than that initial relationship.

Two:  Comparison causes judgement against either yourself or the person you envy.  Pastor Shawn Gabie often says that “comparison is a calling killer.”  If you are objectifying someone, you aren’t honouring or being positive.

Three: Pride is another honour blockage, as is curses for obvious reasons.

Four:  False humility brings resistance in your heart to receive honour, due to brokenness. If you feel unworthy of honour, you are forgetting your instrinsic value that God created you, and if you’ve come to faith, he’s also redeemed you.   That care cost Jesus his life.   Rob Packer says in his excellent book, The Life Giving Power of Honour that “disagreement of what God says about you is arrogance, not humility.”  You actually need to honour yourself, because   “if you dishonour yourself, it shuts you off from receiving.  Acknowledge your gifts, don’t shut them down. They are to be celebrated as a gift that gives glory to God.”

Five:  Lack of gratitude shuts the door to receiving honour. Entitlement shuts down the relationship and stops the flow of honour and love.   Shame also sets up a dark barrier to honour, since it’s the opposite to honour.  However, receiving honour from the Holy Spirit is exactly what the shamed really need.  God is indeed the lifter of our heads.  When we look up into the loving eyes of Jesus,  we can see that he is not the one shaming us.  He paid for our sin, and also heals our broken hearts.

SixRebellion – whether in society, family or the church.  Patricia King says that  if you are joining a church that is new to you, it is important that you honor the leader, whether you agree with them or not. If you do not agree with them in general and do not respect them, then she suggests asking the Lord to do a work within your heart or find another congregation.   David never rebelled against King Saul, even when the king was trying to hurt him. There was always honor. David understood this, which was one of the reasons why God honoured him.

Seven: Over-independence:  Many Americans are very focused on rugged independence.  While it’s good to realize each life matters, it’s counter-productive to be independent to a fault. No one is an island. We grow in relationships, and if you’re alone, it cuts off all doors to honour.  Danny Silk says that “Honour has fallen on hard times in our culture.  Independence is worshipped. We focus on our private relationships with God and have a hard time recognizing spiritual authority, and considering others as more important than ourselves. The result is that we are cut off from the flow of heaven…” (of what God wants to bless us with…)”

Now let’s discover some ways and means that we CAN receive honour.  This is not an exhaustive list, but it comes down to this fact: By honouring others, we intentionally sow honour.

Number one:  We honour God.  It says in 1 Samuel 2:30 that those who honour (God), (He) will honour.  That one sounds simple, but there are so many aspects to this.  If you’re just reading to this one segment of Ways to Grow in God, you need to go back and read the others on this site.  You’ll hear about a lot of ways you can honour God.

Number Two: We need to know who we are: Danny Silk says that “honour empowers people. They realize they carry something no one else carries. We need to develop and release those gifts into the church and world as their part of bringing heaven to earth.”  If you’ve come to faith in Jesus Christ, then you are a child of God.  There is nothing higher than that.  Anything else you do is great, but it’s not who you are.   You have a very high value, much more than you think.

Number Three: We need to be humble. Philippians 2: 5–11 was a scripture passage that Tony and I had declared at our wedding.  It’s one of my favourite scriptures. I’ve shared this passage before. Not only is it about humility, which is a powerful example, but it’s about the honour that Jesus will receive at the end of days.  Every knee will bow before him.  Yet he was also humble.

Listen to the Apostle Paul’s words:  You must have the same attitude that Christ Jesus had. Though he was God,[a]     he did not think of equality with God as something to cling to.   Instead, he gave up his divine privileges[b]; he took the humble position of a slave[c]  and was born as a human being.  When he appeared in human form,[d]   he humbled himself in obedience to God  and died a criminal’s death on a cross.  Therefore, God elevated him to the place of highest honour and gave him the name above all other names, 10 that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow,  in heaven and on earth and under the earth,  11 and every  tongue declare that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.

Kris Valotton says that “honour is humility in action.”  As you can see, there are no control issues there, no manipulation.  There are other scriptures that talk about humility, such as Proverbs 18:12: Before destruction, the heart of man is haughty. But humility goes before honour.  Proverbs 22:4  says that the reward of humility and the fear of the Lord are riches, honour and life.  Proverbs 29:23 says that a man’s pride will bring him low, but a humble spirit will obtain honour.

Patricia King is well known for her teaching on honour.  She also is a lady of humility and grace. She says that she loves “living at the foot of the cross. At the foot of the cross, there are no entitlement issues. You’re just at the foot of the cross, looking at everything that Jesus laid down for you. Everything that Jesus did to give you life. And what he did was that he died.  What he did was he became your sin in exchange for giving you his righteousness.  And when you look at what he did, there is no entitlement there. […] He just humbled himself. He didn’t need to, he was God. He humbled himself and gave forgiveness. He gave himself. He gave it all to us that we would live.  And because he humbled himself more than anyone has ever, his name is exalted above every name in the whole universe.

“Because to the degree that you will humble yourself, that is the degree of honour that you will be given. You don’t go after the honour. You go after humility and honour will come.  You serve people and honour will come. You love people, and honour will come. You don’t demand honour. God can demand honour.  You cannot demand honour. All we really deserve outside Jesus Christ is eternal hell. But because of his love for us, he has exalted us in him. There is so much entitlement out there. It’s based on this prideful attitude, “I should have this, I should have it now, this money, this position, this treatment, because I after all, I am…”   NO, you are not I AM. There is only one I AM.”

Patricia goes further on the entitlement that gets in the way. She says that “there is no entitlement, no matter your leadership role.  Honour has to come as a gift from a person towards you. You don’t demand honour.  Honour has nothing to do with entitlement issues. And sometimes we have so much entitlement.  I share with those I mentor that when you go out to serve people, you don’t put demands on them. You don’t say ‘you have to give me this first class ticket, you have to give me a five star hotel, this much honorarium, etc.  I always say, you go out as a servant. If you go to honour the people that you’re going to serve, honour will come back to you. Even if it doesn’t come back through those people, it will come back through some other way. But you don’t demand it; please don’t have entitlement issues concerning this.

Remember this- if you’re given honour, receive it. This will give you something to give back to God. At the end of the day, we’re going to take all our crowns and pour them out at his feet. All the honour goes to him. It’s not, oh well, I’ll give 80 percent to God and keep 20.  No, he’s the one who gets the honour, because he’s the one who gives the honour to begin with.  So you don’t let the honour that people are giving you – which is a beautiful gift, an undeserved gift – create pride.  When they give it to you, you know that it belongs to God. Don’t let it birth pride in you.”

Number Four:  Be full of grace.  Proverbs 11:16 says that a gracious person obtains honour.   It’s not that a gracious person rejects honour, it’s just that they give the praise to God.  Luke 14:8-11 says that, “everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.”  When you have the mindset of a servant, a servant will never sit in a place of honour on their own.  A servant’s role is to bless others. This means they take the back seat. This scripture says, if you will take that low place, honour will come to you.   Even if you don’t get invited up you might be initially disappointed, because you didn’t get honoured in the way that you wanted. Patricia King shared with a friend that went through this disappointment.   She said, she tried “to share with them that if you relinquish your right to be honoured, you won’t be hurt anymore.” Honour eventually comes to those who humble themselves.     But it’s not just people’s honour. It’s the honour of God. And this is in the eternal realm, when we stand before him and he will honour us.  Some of the people who will be honoured are those not noticed by others.  They were hidden in difficult places and circumstances.  But God notices.   Patricia shares that she remembers when prophet Jill Austin died. I remember too.  She prophesied over me two years before she died, in a way that greatly impacted me.  We’ve posted the video on our Dreams page on our coppleswesterncape dot ca website if you’d like to see it.   So the night that Jill died, Patricia sensed the exact moment Jill went to heaven.  Patricia saw her being received into heaven with so much celebration. She says she began to weep, and said, Lord, why did we not honour her here in earth, like she’s being honoured in heaven.  Patricia said that Jill “was not honoured in the earth. In many ways, she was mistreated.   I was just weeping, and I said, “oh God, if only we could have honoured her like that.”  But she never demanded honour in her life from people, she never demanded it.  But in the glory realm there it was, and that’s where it all counts.  If you spend all your honour on the earth, maybe your bank account will be empty in heaven. But if you live your life in humility and servanthood, it will release a bank account, full of honour and glory for you.  And that is worth living for.”

Number Five: Stay away from strife!  This is a hard one in townships like Avian Park, but this isn’t just about rivalry between gangs. It’s also about strife between any people, including family. Proverbs 20:3 gives us good general advice, when it says,  that “keeping away from strife is an honour, but any fool will quarrel.” Honour and conflict are opposites. Danny Silk shares in his book Developing a Culture of Honour that “honour is one of the most vital core values creating a safe place where people can be free.  Honour protects the value that people have for those who are different than they are.”

Number Six:  Pursue Righteousness and loyalty. If you practice these, honour will return to you.  Proverbs 21:21 says that “whoever pursues righteousness and unfailing love will find life, righteousness, and honour.”

Number Seven:  Doing good, making right choices and integrity also opens the gates of honour.  The Apostle Paul shared about this in Romans 2:7-10. “He will give eternal life to those who keep on doing good, seeking after the glory and honour and immortality that God offers.  But he will pour out his anger and wrath on those who live for themselves, who refuse to obey the truth and instead live lives of wickedness.  There will be trouble and calamity for everyone who keeps on doing what is evil—for the Jew first and also for the Gentile. But there will be glory and honour and peace from God for all who do good—for the Jew first and also for the Gentile.”

Number Eight:  Generosity! Proverbs 22:9 shares that “Blessed are those who are generous, because they feed the poor.”  I can share that Patricia King, who I’ve often shared about has blessed me personally with her generosity. Over the years, she has ministered into my own life either prophetically or in her teaching. I spoke to her in a smaller media conference held in Phoenix back in 2007.  I told her about my then coming mission to Pakistan that would minister to the persecuted church in Pakistan.  She gave me a lot of her own materials to share with the children and adults there.  I trust they are still blessing those she sowed into through me.   Patricia’s big heart and generous nature brings honour back to her not only through my own story, but also the way she sows into other Iris ministry.

Number Nine:  This topic is related to generosity:  that is Sowing. Sowing in this context is specific giving.  When people sow into our ministry through Iris Ministries Canada, that is specific sowing.  Another time a former connect group leader, John, decided to sow into Tony and me last Christmas.  At the time, Tony was ministering to a young Avian Park woman who’s baby died.  John was able to sow not only into us, but into this community.  Proverbs 11:25 says “the generous will prosper; those who refresh others will themselves be refreshed.”   This is a wonderful depiction of receiving just what we need, since we haven’t forgotten others in their need. If you’re honouring others, you’re going to be honoured. What you sow is what you reap.

Number Ten:  Loving Well. The Living Bible version shares this aspect well in 1 Corinthians 14:1. Listen to these words, “Let love be your highest goalPeople who love well are honoured. It’s easy to honour someone who loves so well, you want to honour them. They’re giving themselves to you so that you can be more blessed than you were before. Honour grows when you are loving on and thinking of others without the need to control them.  Kris Valloton says that “honour is the cornerstone of an empowering culture that eliminates the need for control.”  And honour indeed is not about control. It’s a relational blessing both ways.

And so we’ve gone on quite a journey during three articles. We’ve learned about the culture of honour, how to honour, what blocks honour.  While it won’t work for us to intentionally seek honour, this is something that comes through relationship.  Honour is relational with God and others.  You can’t just be on the receiving end.  But when honour does come your way, give thanks.  And then give the honour back to God – it’s all like the flow of a river.  Keep it flowing, and you’ll keep the blessing coming.  I bless you to go out and practice what you’ve learned about honour.  You won’t be sorry you did.

Lord, I ask that you reveal to our hearts ways that we can learn more about honour.  Show us the value you’ve placed on us, and that you want us in this river of love.  You want to crown us as your sons and daughters.  Grow us inside to be strong and confident in you.  Convict and cleanse us from dishonour that we’ve received and given to others.  May we shine for you. We give you all the honour.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

If you’d like to hear the audio version of this teaching, please visit our website coppleswesterncape.ca for the WTGIG podcast.  Then scroll down to #38.  You may also find other teachings there, free of charge.

PS for any of you who pray I was diagnosed with stage 3B inflammatory breast cancer here in South Africa.  We need to go back to Canada in April after the chemotherapy treatments are done to have surgery and more.  Please keep us in prayer for healing and finances. We are crowdfunding, since insurance won’t cover us, and we are already missionaries living by faith.  If you have been blessed by my ministry, please consider sowing into the medical costs if you are able.

Our medical campaign page is here for financial contribution info, medical story and prayer pointsCopple medical page.

 

 

Growing in God: How give and receive honour (Honour pt 2)

My name is Laurie-Ann, and I’m a missionary. During my mission travels, I have ministered with people in Northern Ireland, Pakistan, Canada and the USA.  I’ve also ministered in African countries like Kenya, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, South Africa and Botswana. But at this time, we live in the beautiful Western Cape of South Africa.

During our last article, we learned it’s important to develop a culture of honour.  This means intentionally choosing to honour God, leaders, widows, the vulnerable and everyone we meet.  In earlier teachings we learned about encouragement and blessing. Honour is a BIG part of that.  Honour is choosing to see the potential, the intrinsic value or the hidden gold inside a person. You draw it out of them.  Relationships grow stronger and full of healing when honour is involved.  When we honour and listen to people, it grows your relationship. When we do this with God, it’s very special.   Imagine what would happen if we honour and really listen to our spouse!  No more nagging.  No more need to shut out nagging with half-closed ears. Honour validates.  Dishonour… well, it basically feels like a curse.  That is especially the case with the commandment of honouring your parents.  If you don’t, your life won’t be blessed, or even long-lived.

Tony and I work with children and teens in the townships, as well as some farm children in an area between Worcester and Robertson. Many of these kids don’t understand about honour, and authority.  Some of their parents do, since we’ve often been addressed as tannie and oom.  Our team has been loving on these kids for a year now.  It’s a slow process, since we only see them once a week.  Respect is important and we are earning their respect with being constant.

Yet we also battle a different culture.  How does the Cape Coloured community express honour?  Or the Xhosa?  Or even the Afrikaaners?  We are learning.  Sometimes we have to set aside our Canadian and British sense of honour.  Thankfully there are commonalities.     The language of divine honour is still to hold great value in the people you are with.  Honour actually sustains the human spirit.

We have young teen girls who we have been training to lead Bible studies in Avian Park private homes.  These girls need to honour their hosts, since these venues are opened up for their ministry.  The girls also need to honour the children who are with them.  They would be like big sisters to the children who come to hear stories that will impact their lives.   They need to be consistent in loving them and being there for the younger children.

Years ago, I remember an American prophet who ministered in a Toronto church where I was a parishioner.  His name was Marc Dupont.  He said that just as the medium is the message (a phrase championed by Canadian Marshall McLuhan), so the prophet is the prophecy.  What Marc meant was that whatever you are proclaiming must be shown in your own life.  If you are passionate about spreading the Father God heart of love, then that love must show in your life to others.  If you are to speak about honour, you must model and show honour in your own life. So these girls must show the love of God as big sisters to these kids.  They must also honour the hosts of the house venues where they are ministering.  This is a learning process, and we find that discipling these girls a joy in many ways, yet they need to learn how to honour us as well.    It may take time.  So, we know about establishing a culture of honour. When we honour, it blesses those we honour, but it also blesses us!  This is especially the case of honouring parents, but it also works in honouring everyone.

On the world political scene, the deliberate use of lies and ‘fake news’ to gain political advantage is the very opposite of honouring those who may be standing in the way of a particular objective.  It breaks the rules of classic diplomacy, and it will always in the end worsen the situation.  The attitudes of some leaders have been influenced by the tactics of  thousands of social media users and people attempting to hoodwink as many as possible with urban legends and conspiracy theories.  The whole concept of honour and the value of truth are unknown by such people.

How do we honour?  We start with God.  So how do we honour God?   We honour God with our sincere worship. John records the angels singing in Revelation 4:11, “You are worthy, O Lord our God, to receive glory and honour and power.  For you created all things, and they exist because you created what you pleased.”   We want to worship God in more ways than songs.   It needs to be a lifestyle where we put him first, and honour him above everything else.  We need to pour out what we do every day to God.  I do that in my art, writing and working with children.  I’m still learning to do that in other ways.  God is interested in all we do – not just the things we do in public.  He’s worth it because he is worthy.

We honour God with our tithes and offerings. Proverbs 3:9 asks us to “Honour the Lordwith your wealth and with the best part of everything you produce.”  In the law it was about giving him a tenth, and God would multiply the remaining nine tenths. A tithe is a tenth, and the offerings may be above that, for different reasons.  But whether it’s the first ten percent or an offering, it should be the best we have, not what we’re trying to get rid of.  Why give him garbage when he gave us his best?  The prophet Malachi catches some of this dialogue in Malachi 1: 6-8.  Listen to it in the Message version:

“Isn’t it true that a son honors his father and a worker his master? So if I’m your Father, where’s the honor? If I’m your Master, where’s the respect?” God-of-the-Angel-Armies is calling you on the carpet: “You priests despise me!  “You say, ‘Not so! How do we despise you?’  “By your shoddy, sloppy, defiling worship.  “You ask, ‘What do you mean, “defiling”? What’s defiling about it?’  7-8 “When you say, ‘The altar of God is not important anymore; worship of God is no longer a priority,’ that’s defiling. And when you offer worthless animals for sacrifices in worship, animals that you’re trying to get rid of—blind and sick and crippled animals—isn’t that defiling? Try a trick like that with your banker or your senator—how far do you think it will get you?” God-of-the-Angel-Armies asks you.

Sometimes we defile others when we give hand-me-downs that aren’t in good condition.  Many people in Canada give their garbage clothes away when they are rags.  There’s a reason why certain charities ask for gently used items.  I remember when I came to Kenya for the first time.  I noticed a stall of used clothes in Nairobi and I was interested.  My co-worker Jeff told me, “those clothes came from North America.”  It’s true – so many of our cast-off items do end up in Africa.  Think of how much longer these clothes would last if they were in better condition.  Some are polluted offerings.  And think, how many times we just give our leftover change to God? It’s not like He’s a parking attendant on the street.

We honour God by keeping the truth and speaking it in love. The enemy has always attacked truth, but now, it is more obvious. Currently, truth is twisted about sexual orientation with much confusion over gender identity.  That’s only one area that’s being re-written in many cultures.  There’s also the fight to proclaim life on both ends of the spectrum: conception and natural death.  We have abortion on demand as if it’s birth control.  We have euthanasia for the expendable of any age.  What happened to loving LIFE?  Instead we have a culture of death.  This is a deception to keep us from the word of God.  It’s not honouring.

The Prophet Isaiah warned us in Isaiah 5:20: “What sorrow for those who say that evil is good and good is evil; that dark is light and light is dark, that bitter is sweet and sweet is bitter.”  Talk about confusing!   Malachi 2: 1-8 also talks about God’s priests teaching lies to seekers, and the dishonour that comes when that happens.  Patricia King says that when you step into honour, you step into blessing. When you step into dishonour, you step into a curse.  These scriptures are a call for the priesthood to speak righteousness that will align people with blessings and honour.  We need to keep God’s word as part of honouring him, especially in a way that reflects God’s heart.

We honour God through obedience. This is obedience to God, but it can also affect how we honour our leaders. The writer of the book of Hebrews advises in Hebrews 13:17 to “Obey your spiritual leaders, and do what they say. Their work is to watch over your souls, and they are accountable to God. Give them reason to do this with joy and not with sorrow. That would certainly not be for your benefit.”  Say you’re in a church and the pastor goes into things that are definitely off.  Patricia King has advice on how to handle that.  She says, “If you leave a church due to not feeling comfortable with your decisions, just leave.  Don’t make a fuss. That’s not disobedience. Not making a fuss is actually honouring them. If you do make a fuss, you are cursing your life. It  brings contention, strife and division to that church.

Let’s say that you are in a church and the pastor starts preaching that leaving newborn babies in garbage dumps is fine.  And you’re sitting there, thinking, ‘oh my gosh, that is so not fine.”  In fact, the early church rescued unwanted babies all the time in a stand for life.  So you go and talk with the pastor with respect. You say “pastor, the word says this…  Can you explain to me where you’re getting this from?”  He explains, and you say, “I am so sorry, I love you. But I cannot agree with that. I am not in agreement with it and I cannot support it.  I’m going to be leaving this church. I’m going to be praying for you. I’m not going to be speaking evil against you, but I need to speak the truth in love.”  So you leave, but you do it in honour, not dishonour. God’s going to look after that.  We need to honour God’s truth but in a way that isn’t dishonouring either.

Here’s another example. Say your employer wants you to do something that’s wrong. Nicky Gumbel tells a story on Alpha about Gimbo, a man who refused to lie on the phone for his employer, Harrods. He was asked to tell the caller that his boss was out and Gimbo refused.  When the boss got off the phone, he was angry; but Gimbo replied, “If I can lie for you, I can lie TO you.  And I won’t ever do that.”  From then on, Gimbo became the most trusted employee in that company.  Gimbo honoured his boss.

And now to honour others.  How do we honour them?  Here’s some things that will help you.  Look for the good in each other.  Celebrate each other.  I remember helping people in a divorce recovery workshop back in the 90’s.  Holy Spirit impressed on my heart that these hurting people needed not only to forgive, but they needed to honour their former spouses.  As well as any potential new spouses!  When Tony and I married, we included mutual encouragement in our vows.  We could have included honour as well.  But the core is to look for the good in each other and celebrate that.  Don’t speak bad about them to other people, although sometimes you may have to acknowledge issues to work through in private.

And then there are the people that seem to rub you the wrong way.  It may just be a cultural difference or a personality quirk.  So don’t look at that one thing that drives you crazy.  Look for things that you can honour.  Look for things you can celebrate. You can always find SOMETHING to celebrate in that person.  Look at their intrinsic value – what they have inside.

One way to honour is to celebrate birthdays.  In our Worcester church, they post the names of all the people who have a birthday that week. A leader then shares a word of encouragement to the birthday people.  I celebrated a birthday during Harvest School in northern Mozambique, and I was showered all day with love, songs, cake and more. I think it was my favourite birthday.   Those were acts of honour.  Then there’s mother’s day and father’s day. You come to church and they honour parents on their day.  I’ve received flowers and chocolate and Tony’s received fishing birdies, chocolate and biltong. Those days are an opportunity to honour each other.  It’s one thing I like about Facebook – it reminds you of your friend’s birthdays!  It’s easy to honour on a birthday. Could we choose to honour on the other days of the year?

Last week we talked about honouring our parents. You can also honour your children. If you are a parent, aunt, uncle or children’s worker, you can speak life into these kids. Recognize the unique way that God has created them to be. Allow them to be who they are.  Don’t compare them with their siblings.  Listen to their ideas and tell them that you’re proud of them. Tony and I honour our girls by encouraging them to say what they love about each other.  This is becoming a regular exercise.  They are beginning to respond, and last week, Bella decided that she would say what she loved about us.  The previous week, the girls told me that they loved the way I loved them.  Bella told me that the first time I welcomed her to our home, she felt loved and all warm inside.  She’s come to think of me as a second mother and she told me she loved me.  Then she turned to Tony. She told him that she loved him also, and said that he was kind, full of respect for people and that he is there for them.   Wow, we really felt honoured by Bella, who has such a gift of encouragement and teaching.

We can honour each other by preferring them over ourselves.  One way to do this is to be generous.  There are so many ways to do that.  Sometimes gifts are helpful, other moments need acts of service.

We can honour each other by speaking well of them in public as well as private.  This includes when the person is not even there – it’s not done for effect to impress that person.  But even then, some people can honour publicly but dishonour them in private. Patricia King says that “sometimes we’ll say something nice about a person because it’s right to do. But then we’ll go talk to someone else in negativity about them, and that’s dishonouring.  That cancels out your honour. You want to have honour on every side.”

We can honour someone by giving them a special personal gift, like the Queen of Sheba did to Solomon. Don’t you feel honoured when someone gives you a gift? It’s like wow, they were thinking of me!   This is what I tried to do when I drew some of our kids club children in a drawing with Jesus.  One of the girls was amazed and said with wonder, “Wow, you thought of me??  Jesus was also thinking of me?”  That reaction made it all worthwhile.  She received the love and felt honoured.

We can honour by caring for others – especially widows and the vulnerable.  Sometimes they need a little offering to them to give them hope and a sense of value.  It’s beautiful.

Honour is also something that can be culturally sensitive.  It requires awareness and a gentleness to go carefully when you approach someone.  Honour is something that is easier if we deal with the junk in our hearts.  The junk includes unforgiveness, pride and conflict.  If these things are not dealt with in our lives, they can lead to the very opposite of honour.  They will further fragment broken relationships, cause wounded hearts, inequality, pain and fear.

Forgiveness is something that arose again and again in Rob Packer’s book The Life-Giving Power of Honour, as well as Danny Silk’s book Developing a Culture of Honour.  Forgiveness is powerful. I’ve watched healing happen through the lives of those forgiving and the forgiven.   Anglican pastor Dale Lang publicly forgave the school shooter who killed his son back in 1999.  Dale ministers to other families who have endured similar suffering and he brings forgiveness and love into the equation.  He’s able to honour them, since he knows the pain, and he also knows that bitterness and unforgiveness is a trap.

It’s too easy to not forgive if you feel you have been dishonoured.  This can happen with friends and family who may have become too familiar with you. They may not even recognize they are dishonouring you. Proverbs 18:19 says that “it is harder to make amends with an offended friend than to capture a fortified city.”  I know this truth personally.

Years back, I made a cultural error with a female Japanese pastor I was friends with at the time. When you are in a Japanese home, you must take your shoes off as a sign of respect and honour.  I always did this, except for one time, where I just wasn’t thinking.  I brought over another friend to introduce to this lady, and I was focused on my other friend, rather than my hostess.  I forgot to take off my shoes.  She became extremely upset with me, shooed me out, and never spoke to me again.  While I apologized deeply and sincerely for my momentary lapse, this was not enough.  I grieved the loss of the friendship, and I never forgot this lesson on honour.  When Tony and I took a tour of our South African rental home, the then-current tenants were from South Korea.  They also showed honour by taking off their shoes, but they offered honour to us by offering little sockettes to cover our feet.  So we complied and smiled at them.

So when you honour, remember that honour grows nobility in people.   Honour is humility in action. It’s the very opposite of pride that isolates you into a prison of self.  Kris Valloton says that “for a Christian, honour is a condition of the heart, not just the product of a good environment.”

Today we’ve journeyed on how to honour others.  There’s so much to learn, but along the path, I’ve hinted at times on how we receive honour.  Since honour is relational, it usually is returned back.  On our next broadcast we’ll discover more about how to receive or obtain honour.   Because we are God’s creations, we have special value inside. And when we come to faith, we have Christ in us, the hope of glory.  Look for the gold in each other and choose to honour.

Lord, I ask you to help us learn to honour others.  Help us to honour you and to learn the importance of honour. Open our eyes to see the beauty in others, whether they are family, friends, or complete strangers.  May we be instruments in healing where dishonour has wounded souls, as you are healing us.

In Jesus’ name. Amen.

If you would like to hear an audio version of this article, please follow this link to CopplesWesternCape.ca and scroll down to #37

Blessings and love, Laurie-Ann

PS for any of you who pray – I was diagnosed with stage 3B inflammatory breast cancer here in South Africa.  We will need to go back to Canada after the chemotherapy treatments are done, to continue treatment in Ottawa.  Please keep us in prayer for healing and finances.  We are crowdfunding, since insurance won’t cover this, and we are already missionaries living by faith.

Our medical campaign page is here for financial contribution info, medical story info and prayer points: Copple Medical page.

 

Growing in God through Honour: Part 1 Developing a culture of honour

Image is from Bethel Church, Ottawa, Ontario.

My name is Laurie-Ann, and I’m a missionary. During my mission travels, I have ministered with people in Northern Ireland, Pakistan, Canada and the USA.  I’ve also ministered in African countries like Kenya, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, South Africa and Botswana. But at this time, we live in the beautiful Western Cape of South Africa.

During our last article, we journeyed through growing in God in the midst of windstorms.  There is evil in the world, and sometimes that really feels like a damaging firestorm that brings pain, loss, and more.  Jesus warned us that the devil comes to steal, kill and destroy.  But he gives abundant life.  He is our windbreaker to combat evil through the armour of God.  The Holy Spirit is also like a true Cape Doctor, in bringing healing, hope, comfort, truth and refining. Allow yourself to set your face on God, and he’ll bring that sweet wind to lift you up and give you strength for your journey. If the Holy Spirit is the holy wind, we are the sail.

Grace is something that is very prevalent in our faith as we choose to trust God and follow where he leads us.  God is faithful and shows this in many ways. We can even see this faithfulness reflected in others.  Sometimes God’s characteristics like love and faithfulness can be understood as a language that people can understand without words. A wonderful way to see God’s language reflected in you is through developing a culture of honour.  The military have a sense of honour that manifests as a code of conduct. It shows as valour, chivalry, honesty and compassion.  These are good traits.  Honour sometimes is understood how one may look in the eyes of other people – in a positive way, people can see the goodness and compassion inside a person and call them “honourable.”  In a negative way, this may be a mask hiding what really is inside, or perhaps honour could be construed as “face.”  Face is very important in Chinese cultures, as honour of purity is important in Middle Eastern culture.  But true honour is even deeper than that.

Honour is relational.  In the West, it’s not popular to speak well of people until after they die.  You could work for years in a company or NGO and find that many people don’t bother saying nice things about you.  It’s simply assumed that you know that you are well liked.  Yet if you make a mistake, complaints are issued quickly.  We certainly find this attitude online on Facebook and Twitter.  However, when someone dies, people like to share wonderful stories about how you touched their lives in a positive way.  Eulogies and telling stories of people who have blessed you is a good thing!  However, you need not wait until a person dies to say good things about them.  These people really need to hear this when it really matters to them!  The first time I learned about honour as an expression of blessing, was through two Canadians in ministry: Patricia King, and Faytene Grassechi.

Faytene has a heart for change through social justice, prayer and encouragement.  One of the ministries that she developed visits and prays for different people in the Canadian government.  They include young leaders who honour and serving these Canadian politicians. They basically represent the voice of Christian youth to Canadian parliament.  They don’t put down the leaders. But rather, they encourage them for what they are doing well.  They honour them and listen to them.  These leaders are blessed by the encouragement. They feel that they have been honoured, not criticized.  Faytene was encouraged to have honour as an important component to her ministry, as taught by her mentor Patricia King, who is also Canadian.  I was a supporter of Patricia for over ten years, while I was able.  Patricia is a generous, kind and honour-bearing person. She never speaks badly of any who speak badly of her. She chooses to bless her opponents and to honour them.  This goes beyond forgiveness. It’s a lifestyle of choosing to bless and note all the good things her opponent is doing.

Patricia notes that to honour is to hold someone is respect or esteem.  She says that it’s “interesting that the word Hebrew word “kabod,”or glory, means ‘weight.’  This word is often used in scripture to give honour.  It is an interchangeable word for honour, although it also shows splendour, glory and dignity.  It’s really interesting that honour is so tied in with the glory of God and the weight of his presence.  God loves honour and he hates dishonour.”  Patricia has seen over the years, that when there is an individual of honour, (who exercises honour intentionally), doors fly open for them. Promotion comes from the Lord to them, and blessing comes on their lives.  Patricia has also seen the exact opposite when a person is given to dishonour.   When there is dishonour in their lives, they dishonour leaders, and they dishonour their parents, the exact opposite happens. It’s like a curse comes over their lives.  The doors are closed.  She has even seen people with tremendous anointing and ministry callings; but because they are people of such dishonour, their spiritual gifts NEVER break open. They never get established, yet they’ve got so many gifts to release out to people.  One of the biggest secrets to advancement is to honour others.  It’s tied in with humility.  Tony Morgan notes that “if you want to receive honour, you have to give honour.  If you want to experience honour, you have to embrace humility.”

So honour promotes and dishonour demotes. Honour blesses and dishonour curses. Honour builds strong relationships, dishonour destroys relationships.  Honour is pleasant, dishonour is unpleasant.

Rob Packer teaches about honour in his excellent book, The Life Giving Power of Honour.  He says that “Honour is the recognition of a person’s value and the expression appropriate to that value.”  When you are honoured and recognized for who you are, you are valued.  You are also released to BE who you are.  When you honour others, you release them to be who they are to you.  They feel safe to be who they are. Dishonour is just the opposite.  It shuts down the relationship between you and the other person.  You can’t receive what they have to give you, since they aren’t allowed to do so.  It was the same when Jesus wasn’t given honour in his hometown.  He wasn’t allowed to love on his town and people, except in a very limited way.  No wonder he couldn’t do any more than a few healings in Nazareth!

Tony and I are involved with the Iris Global movement as Iris Ministries Canada missionaries. This movement’s slogan says, “love looks like something.” And so it does.  Love is active. Love and honour easily work together; in fact, if you love someone, there must be honour involved.  Our Mama Heidi was shown the importance of honour when she had a problem.  She prayed over bush outreach struggles that were happening in northern Mozambique.  There was resistance. People threw stones, and Heidi was tired of it.  She knew something was missing, so she asked God what it wasThen the Holy Spirit revealed to her that she needed to meet the village leaders, and to honour them. She was instructed to do something different. Before this, she ignored the leaders, and set up competing movies and evangelism that were louder than their own meetings.  Now, she was directed to meet these leaders. She needed to get to know them and to honour them.

She brought the international Harvest School students who were with her, and asked them to bow before the leaders, and introduce themselves to each leader.  The leaders were now in a relationship with Heidi. They felt ready to welcome and invite the students to their villages. Gifts were given to the leaders. Concerns were genuinely addressed.  Since that time, all Harvest School students go into the bush with Heidi or other senior leaders. This is a special time of publicly honouring the village leaders.  The blessing goes both ways. It really does.

Tony and I experienced this honour ceremony in Linde, Mozambique.  We shook hands with the leaders. They were genuinely happy to see us. We experienced a welcome that was truly heart-felt.  Honour truly IS the language of the God’s kingdom. It opens doors.  It blesses hearts.   The Bible has much to say about honour.  Let’s start the honour countdown with eight examples of honour!

Number one: It all starts with honouring God.  Rev. 5:12   gives us a picture of honour in heaven, when all there sing in a mighty chorus:  “Worthy is the Lamb who was slaughtered— to receive power and riches, and wisdom and strength, and honor and glory and blessing.”  Patricia King reminds us that “God is to be honoured, and not just on Sunday mornings! And not just in our songs, but in everything that we do.” This means that we would give him honour in and through our lives.

Number twoHonour your parents.  Exodus 20 says to honour your father and mother.  It’s the first commandment with a promise.  When you honour your folks, “you will live a long and full life in the land.”  Another version says that your days may be prolonged. Jesus even quoted this commandment in Matt 15: 4.

God is very clear about honouring father and mother.  Some of us may have had fathers and mothers that perhaps in your mind don’t deserve to be honoured.  But this commandment is clear despite how imperfect our parents are. Patricia King says that “when you position yourself in honour, it positions you for blessing.  You will live long in the land that the Lord gives you, which is his kingdom. It’s his promises, the land of his goodness, the land of his abundant life.  So when you honour your parents, it positions you in the blessing of the Lord.”

In the case of where parents have abused you,  this honour is not about their wrong deeds and harm they have done. You need to forgive them for that.  But you can’t empower evil. In this case, as a step, at least don’t dishonour them.  It’s not about what they deserve, but rather, to honour that they are your parents.  My mother used to tell me, “Laurie-Ann, if you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all.”  So sometimes it’s better not to say anything.  Sometimes honouring a parent is simply to not dishonour them.

Here’s a Biblical example of not honouring a parent.  We know that in the case of Noah, he had one son who uncovered his nakedness.  Ham and his son Canaan were cursed.  Why?  Ham uncovered his father’s nakedness. He exposed him; when the other sons covered him.   He dishonoured his father’s dignity, rather than honoured him. God wants us to walk in honour, so this goes for your spiritual parents too.  Most of us have had spiritual parents who have nurtured us, but no one is perfect.  There’s been areas where they have been a blessing to you and not been a blessing to you, but we need to honour them as well.

Tony and I saw a beautiful example of honour when we visited Bethel Church in Redding, California. This is the same famous church known for contemporary worship music and great teaching. They have a 14-7 prayer house, healing rooms, outreach, and so much more.  We arrived at the early service on Father’s Day 2017.  Eric Johnson chose to not only honour the fathers, but also the single moms in the house.  These women were trying to fill the place of both mother AND father to their children.  He encouraged the congregation to bless them financially and with a hug.  And so they did, including my own Tony.   This same honour attitude was also extended to those who came to faith that day.  In many churches I’ve been involved with, they have everyone close their eyes and people can slip hands up anonymously.  I understand why they do that, but at the same time, those people can also be frightened from any contact, so it’s good to welcome them in honour.  Eric told them that they acknowledge them in the open, so they can be encouraged, rather than to hide.   They are seen as that important.   Parents also need to honour their children, so that you allow them to be who they truly are. The Apostle Paul warns fathers in Eph. 6:4, don’t exasperate your children by coming down hard on them. Take them by the hand and lead them in the way of the Master. (Message)

Number threeHonour our elders.  Lev. 19:32  says to   “Stand up in the presence of the elderly, and show respect for the aged. Fear your God. I am the Lord.”  Tony and I have noticed there is more of a culture of honour in South Africa towards the tannies and ooms then we have in North America. We celebrate that.    We found the same in Sierra Leone, where their strong culture of honour is helping heal divisions from their civil war. Rob Packer says there is a prevalent mindset in western culture that expects people who are over 60 to retire from work, get their pension, play bowls, move to an old folks home and wait to die.  They say they have done their bit, they have had their day, and now they should move over and let the younger ones do their thing.  That is such a strategy from the enemy!  Older folk have the greatest time availability, greatest life experience, and financial resources.  Many great businesses, inventions, and art is produced by people aged 60 to 90.   Patricia King also encourages seniors to get out there on the front lines of ministry.  She says the second half of life of these people can be greater than their first half was.

Yet in the west, there is the rise of elder abuse.   We see elderly people taken advantage of financially. They are targeted in scams with no conscience against it whatsoever. Some of these seniors are left absolutely bankrupt with no way to care for themselves.  Even some family members, have been abused rather than honoured. They’re just put in a home, and forgotten and never visited.   I’ve been fortunate in my family.  My maternal grandparents were cared by my aunt, uncle and cousins.  I even took three months off from volunteer work to care for my own parents in 2015.  It was an honour to do so.  Right now, we live in a retirement community and are always happy to see family visit our neighbours.  We even plan to visit the most frail of our community. This gives us great joy. I look forward to seeing my folks again on our home visit next year.  We always pray for their health and life.   Our friend and co-worker Maggie loves and ministers in the old-age home in nearby Robertson, as well as many seniors in that community. She is a real representation of honouring the elderly, in a special, loving way.  That love and honour that she shows them pleases God. It touches them and Maggie is blessed in the giving.

Number fourHonour widows. The Apostle Paul mentions honouring real widows in 1 Tim 5:3.   Some of these widows and widowers are just barely getting by. They are lonely and need to be honoured; they need to be loved on. They need to be esteemed, blessed, invited out, and given affirmations.  Sometimes they need finances, so every once and a while, slip them some rand notes when you shake their hand.  Some people call this a Pentecostal handshake, although I can say that Anglicans and Baptists have done this to me when wishing me well on short-term mission trips.  Psalm 68 mentions about God placing the lonely into families.  I’ve always understood this scripture as the long-term singles, since I was one until Tony scooped me up.  However, it also applies to the widowed.  Perhaps there is a lonely widow or widower in your community that you can adopt as your own tannie or oom.  I can think of a few here in Worcester.

Number fiveHonour church leaders.  We need to give special honour to church leaders for their care of preaching and teaching.  Paul encourages us to give double honour in 1 Tim 5:17, as well as the reminder in 1 Thess. 5:13 that we must esteem them, because they are working hard for you.  I know that my Ottawa pastors of John, Shawn, David and Trisha often would endure complaints as well as praise. David and Trisha even stepped down from one of my churches in a painful situation.  They are still in my prayers.  Sometimes a few of my past pastors have made mistakes and hurt my feelings.  But they were not intentional.  Our leaders are human, just like we are.

Sometimes famous Christian leaders are slammed, judged, and criticized openly and behind their backs. There are many Facebook posts of others that are in agreement, who also dishonour them.    Patricia King asked her own parishioners to not do post any posts on their Facebook pages that are negative, critical and cruel.   She asks them to stop negative talk, and to speak positively or not at all.  I personally take that stance.  I also remember Heidi Baker making a joke that she doesn’t  type her name into Google.  Some people have pegged her and other charismatic leaders as outright demonic.  Now THAT is dishonouring. And she’s not the only target.  Unfortunately people who do that create a culture of dishonour.  Even Jesus was pegged as demonic by some of the Pharisees.

Our Afrikaaner pastors,  Johan and Peter-Louis, have treated us with honour. It is easy to love and honour them back.  But even then, they and their families need our prayers. So does your own pastor, and all the leadership that works with them.  Please do pray for them and choose to honour them.  It will bless both you and them.

Number sixHonour other leaders who may not be as visible as those on stage.  1 Corinthians teaches to give more honour to the invisible ones.  In honouring them, scripture doesn’t say to honour them only if they are perfect and flawless. Criticism and judgmental attitudes hurt those leaders. It also hurts those who criticize. It’s dishonouring, so best to pray for the leader. Deal with your own attitude and forgive mistakes.   In the case of dealing with abuse, assault and the like; well, that must be reported. But if we’re talking criticism and complaining over minor issues, it’s time to forgive and move on in a gentle way.  A critical spirit is only going to harm your own walk with God. It will drag down your health and relationships.  Instead, choose to honour. Find kind ways to express disagreement without causing harm.

Number sevenHonour our government leaders; and our employers. Paul wrote in 1 Tim 6:1 to regard your masters as worthy of all honour.  Even if they are nasty, you must honour your employer. This means to not bad mouth them to other employees.  You are to honour them so that God himself won’t be looked upon in a bad way. We are to be absolutely blameless in this sense.  We are to be people of honour.

Even in the political realm, there’s a lot of people – even Christians – that will slam leaders terribly, with a critical attitude.   This isn’t just about US president Trump, but every leader.  These people may need constructive criticism but not curses. They need our prayers for difficult decisions. We pray all the time for Cyril Ramaphosa.

Patricia King loves the example of David and King Saul in 1 Sam 24: 2-13. In this story, David had an actual opportunity to take Saul out.  Patricia says that “Saul was the appointed king.  David was anointed as king, but he wasn’t appointed yet. He wasn’t in position yet, but he was blessed to be king. So he could have flaunted his authority.  But he didn’t.  He actually repented –  even from taking a piece of Saul’s garment. He had still ‘touched’ the anointed of God in a negative way. He did not take his life, he did not harm him in any way.  He said to Saul, “why are you doing this to me? I’ve only honoured you.” Saul made his own choice before God.  Patricia thinks that the reason why David got promoted was because he was a man of honour. Despite his mistakes, he was a man after God’s own heart.

David was greatly honoured, because he sowed honour.  He passed his honour test.  Patricia shares that “you will always be watched by God before you go into promotion. You have to pass your honour test.  Because if you fail an honour test,  you will not be able to properly stand in your next place very well. You will fail in that place. God wants you to always pass the test of honour; and you will be tested.”

You might think, ‘well, that person doesn’t deserve my honour.”  David could have thought this way, but he didn’t!  If he did take that attitude in his heart towards Saul, he would have failed the honour test.  But instead, he passed the honour test. “He held the honour test strong, right to the finish, because even after that, he didn’t become king right away. He had to still walk that out. He chose to be humble and he honoured the king.  It takes time to honour in that way, but it sets up a good foundation for the future.

Number eight: Honour each other!  This includes our spouses, best friends and everyone else. If you thought you were being missed out in this honour-fest, well, you’re in the party!  You’ve not been forgotten.  The Apostle Paul asks us in Phil 2:3 to esteem or honour others. In Rom. 12:10, Paul says to love each other with genuine affection, and to take delight in honouring each other.”   I’ve watched this love and honour in action at Iris gatherings where they all scramble to pay the bill.  I know our Iris leaders have certainly honoured and encouraged us.  We’ve been honoured and loved on by Janis, our Iris Ministries Canada director.  And sure enough, she bought me lunch.  We all need to grow in giving honour.  We could see this as a positive challenge.

If you value something you will take care of it, you will honour it.  For example, if you have a three carat diamond ring, you see the value in that. You’re not going to be careless with that diamond ring. You’re not just going to take it off your finger and forget where you put it; because you value that ring.  In the US, there is a company who markets caramel popcorn and peanuts in a box and call it “Cracker Jack.”  Inside the Cracker Jack box is a ring.  If you pull out the ring from a Cracker Jack box, you may like it, but you’re not going to value it the same as the diamond ring.  It doesn’t have the value of the diamond ring.

Whatever you value, you will honour.  I believe that God wants us to learn to value each other like he values us.  When he looks at each of you as individuals, he values you beyond anything you can understand.  He is willing to give everything to you because you have such great value to him.  When we look at each other, and we can’t see value, just ask the Holy Spirit to reveal it to our hearts.  He will help us honour each other.  He reveals our value.  You might look at the person and think, nah, … they’re losers.  But they are not losers in God’s eyes.  When you look through his eyes, and ask him to reveal his heart for that person, it will change the way that you see them.

If you can change the way that you see them, and see the value in them, you will honour them.   This is the core truth in many Facebook posts about seeing the gold in people, rather than the dirt.  Yes, we all have dirt, but we also have gold.  So it’s easy to honour what you value. I believe that God wants us to see the pure gold in each other. He wants us to see the potential.  He wants us to encourage that potential in each other. One of the BEST things about raising children is to NOT tell them how bad they are. Don’t point out all the bad things that they’re doing, and all their mistakes.   They better fix this, fix that, do this and do that, ‘cause you’re just not making the mark.  If you do that, you’ll destroy your child. They’ll become people-pleasing strivers and not know who they are.

If you’re doing that, you’ll find out that you’re destroying their self-image, you’ll destroy everything about them.  Instead, start speaking into them, who they really are. When you  discipline them, call them up into who they are. This transforms the way that they live and the way that they grow up.  They’ll grow up strong and straight, because they’re being valued. If you feel valued by someone, you’ll live differently, than you will if you feel like you’ve been hated by people.   Have you ever gone into an environment where you’ve felt despised?  It’s just like you want to hide, you fumble, you’re not yourself, you don’t rise up in confidence; but when you go into a place where you know you are valued and loved, it just pulls up in you the fullness of who you are.

Despite our mistakes, if we honour each other, and see potential in each other, we’ll see each other grow.  It will be so beautiful.  So honour is a key in building strong people, community and family.  Honour is a big deal in countries like Sierra Leone, who is still healing from their civil war. And honour is due to the one who eternally loves us.

So we have learned there is so much to establishing a culture of honour.  When we choose to honour, we will in turn be honoured ourselves. It isn’t all one way.  So as we choose to honour God, our parents, our leaders, the widows, the vulnerable and each other, we are also within that honour matrix.  In earlier broadcasts we learned about encouragement and blessing.  To honour is to take that further.  In our next broadcast, we will learn further HOW we can honour.

Lord, I ask you to please teach us deeply in our hearts about honour.  Show us ways that we have been dishonouring to others. Show us how we complain and speak to our hearts about how to stop these habits. Show us your way, the way of honour, the way of love.  Show us what honour looks like.  We thank you for your faithfulness to us and give you all the honour of making our lives beautiful. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

If you would like to hear an audio version of this article, please follow this link to CopplesWesternCape.ca and scroll down to #36

We’ll continue to journey through honour as part of a four-part series.

Blessings and love
Laurie-Ann Copple

Growing in God through Seasons of Wind

My name is Laurie-Ann, and I’m a missionary. During my mission travels, I have ministered with people in Northern Ireland, Pakistan, Canada and the USA.  I’ve also ministered in African countries like Kenya, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, South Africa and Botswana. But at this time, we live in the beautiful Western Cape of South Africa.

During our last article, we journeyed through re-writing our story.  While past events don’t change, our perception of them can.  When we learn how to psalm, journal and reframe our memories, we can learn from past mistakes. We can grow very deeply so that in time we will not be swayed by difficult times. We may even thrive through them, since God’s hand is there.  He walks with us through the hard times, and sometimes even carries us.  Think of how the Psalms were written.  Most of those writers endured difficult times, and deep disappointments.  But they were given grace as they chose to trust in God.

Grace is something that is very prevalent in our faith as we choose to trust God and follow where he leads us. Sometimes following can include times were we endure windstorms in our lives.  We’re going to journey through different kinds of wind – both in the natural world and in the spiritual world.  The spiritual windstorms are similar to the desert experience I spoke on in an earlier week, although windstorms can definitely be more intense.

In the natural world, wind is one of the tools that the desert uses to take moisture out of the soil.  You would think it’s the sun, but it’s also the wind.   I’ve encountered wind in certain deserts and semi-deserts, such as New Mexico, Kenya, Argentina’s Patagonia and South Africa’s Little Karoo.  It’s the wind that seems biting in the cold; and bracing in the heat.   Apparently this same process of desiccation, can happen inside a freezer with an ice cube.  Have you noticed that old freezer ice cubes are smaller?

In Canada, the windiest seasons are during transition – March is a windy season, perfect for flying kites… if you are bundled up for the cold.  And November, it’s cool, rainy and windy – as the remaining autumn leaves of colour are blown off the trees.

In Worcester, the Cape Doctor wind is mainly a summer wind from the south, and there’s a winter wind that is mighty chilly. If the wind is strong, usually it signals rain.   There’s also the warm “Berg” wind that is similar to Calgary’s chinooks. Tony recently shared with me something he had been teaching in his science classes, that wind is also essential for the earth: as water evaporates  in one area, such as the sea, and accumulates in clouds, the wind blows the clouds  to other areas that may really need rain.

I recently discovered why the Cape Doctor is given its name.  The Cape Doctor is the local name for the strong, often persistent, dry south-easterly wind that blows on the South African coast from September to March – or spring to late summer in the southern hemisphere.  It’s given its name because of a local belief that it clears Cape Town of pollution and pestilence.  I’ve also been told that Brewelskloof TB hospital here in Worcester keeps its windows open for health reasons, because the wind is thought to clear bad air out of the wards.   How many times have young children been encouraged to get away from the TV, or their video games? They need to go outside and enjoy the fresh air.  So some wind is good.  It’s a matter of how MUCH wind.

Wind has always been an important source of power – for example for ships before the age of steam. Pilots can do the same if they fly along the Jetstream.  This means they can fly further with using less fuel.  We live near a glider airport in Worcester, and in some ways it’s appropriate to have gliders here.  The wind is often strong. Why not harness it?   People still go windsailing, parasailing, and  in sailboats in different waters.

One of the ways wind is harnessed now is with wind turbines.  We’ve seen a few of those in the Eastern Cape.  I’ve seen many more in the UK, Canada and in the American plains.

Wind can also be used to purify and clean.  I remember a scene in an original Star Trek television episode, called “Mudd’s Women.”  The women were used as a bargaining chip on a mining planet.  One of the women, Eve, didn’t like what was going on, and she ran off into the howling dust storm, very upset.  The lead miner rescued her, but they didn’t initially get along.  They bickered.  When the miner said that her cooking wasn’t that great, and that it tasted like his own, Eve said, “Well, you’re tasting some of it now.  I couldn’t scrub off the layers of food.”  He complained back that he had no water to clean with.  She replied, “well, hang up the pots in the wind, and let the sand scour the pots clean.”  Good thinking, Eve.  Wind can be used to purify; although in that case, it included the biting sand.   Sea salt can do the same if you’re on the edge of an ocean wind.

But wind is also destructive in higher velocity.  The wind doesn’t have to be a tornado to cause intense or long-lasting damage.  Strong winds can put plants in survival mode. I’ve seen the fynbos shrubs near Mitchell’s Plain, and near Cape Point.  They are weirdly shaped, as if crawling away from the nearby Atlantic Ocean.  I’ve seen other plants grow away from the wind in other areas, like Yorkshire in England, Patagonia in Argentina.  In the high north of Canada and Russia, there aren’t any trees. The wind is too strong for them to survive.

Gardeners share that wind greatly affects plants throughout their growth. When plants are seedlings, slight breezes help them grow sturdier. If wind is at gale strength,  it can damage or even break and blow down the strongest tree, sometimes crashing into someone’s house or car.  Winter wind is especially damaging because plants can’t replace the water they lose, so they shrink and wither.   So when the winds are destructive, you need a windbreak.  You need a protective shield.

We need to make sure that the plants have protection, and can adapt so that they’re not always directly facing the wind.  To be against the wind, as the Bob Seger anti-establishment song goes, is to act in defiance.  This actually goes against survival unless understood as a short-term endurance test.

Just before we left for South Africa in November 2017, our neighbour gave me a novel about South African history called The Covenant, by James Michener.  While many of the characters were not real, the stories behind them were based on real events and movements.  Michener uses the Van Doorn family as one of the Afrikaaner voices through four hundred years.  Free burgher Willem Van Doorn struggled with the wind damage to his attempts to establish long-lasting wine-producing vines.  His colleagues said, “In their opinion, there could be no spot in this forlorn land where the winds did not howl.” But they showed him how to plant trees to give protection.

Willem’s Malay girlfriend encouraged him to plant differently according to the wind direction. Michener says, “But she was acquainted with growing things and said, “Willem, those vines are dying.”  Willem replied, “Why? Why do they die?”  She said, “The rows run the wrong way. The wind hits them too strong.” And she showed him how, if he planted his vines along the direction from which the winds blew, and not broadside to it, only the lead plants would be affected, which the sun would be free to strike all the vines evenly.”   So if you know the direction of the wind, you can actually grow a stronger root system.

Spiritually, we also endure windstorms.  Some of these are destructive – in the evil that assaults us.  Evil comes in the form of human greed.  It also is a malevolent spiritual force that seeks to harm.  Jesus tells us in John 10 verse 10 The thief’s purpose is to steal and kill and destroy. My purpose is to give them a rich and satisfying life.  The thief that Jesus describes, is Satan, the father of lies, as well as stealing.  Supernatural evil gives strength and fury to the already awful human evil and rebellion.  Mixed together, it becomes a horrible firestorm.  You definitely need protection from that.   This is where the spiritual windbreak comes in:  the protection against evil.  The Apostle Paul shares that our struggles really reflect what’s going on spiritually – not just face to face in the physical world.  People can be deceived by the onslaught of evil whispers to their minds, and so they fall into all kinds of sin, big and small.

Paul shares about the armour of God in Ephesians 6 verses 10 to 18.  He says, 10 A final word: Be strong in the Lord and in his mighty power. 11 Put on all of God’s armour so that you will be able to stand firm against all strategies of the devil. 12 For we[d] are not fighting against flesh-and-blood enemies, but against evil rulers and authorities of the unseen world, against mighty powers in this dark world, and against evil spirits in the heavenly places.

13 Therefore, put on every piece of God’s armour so you will be able to resist the enemy in the time of evil. Then after the battle you will still be standing firm. 14 Stand your ground, putting on the belt of truth and the body armor of God’s righteousness. 15 For shoes, put on the peace that comes from the Good News so that you will be fully prepared.[e] 16 In addition to all of these, hold up the shield of faith to stop the fiery arrows of the devil.[f] 17 Put on salvation as your helmet, and take the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.

18 Pray in the Spirit at all times and on every occasion. Stay alert and be persistent in your prayers for all believers everywhere.[g] So a spiritual windbreak, is indeed, known as the armour of God.  You can ask for this in prayer daily.  Let the armour stand against the evil winds.  Take shelter in God, although stand in him, don’t hide. Keep your focus on him in the midst of the storm.  I’ve done this many a time, in encountering evil in different countries, as well as in my own life.   Before I came to faith in Jesus, I actively participated in evil by fortune telling.  I was in complete ignorance that this was evil, and so was right in the midst of the storm.  I’m thankful that I was drawn out by the Holy Spirit speaking to me the year before I came to faith.  I remember sitting at a friend’s kitchen table, wondering what I should do about my struggling art career, and crumbling life.  I told myself that the following year would be the time to change my life.  When I said that out loud to myself, I felt like a waterfall of love flowed over me.  The Holy Spirit whispered to my heart, “Good! Now’s the time to find God.”  I someone knew intuitively that he meant Jesus.  So I began to search.   The Holy Spirit began blowing the winds of God to me, so that I would be carried to Jesus in my search.  I didn’t want to fight.  Why would I want to fight pure love?

So I set my face towards God, and allowed the Holy Spirit to blow me towards Jesus like a sail.  At the time I used a Star Trek metaphor and called it my holy tractor beam.  Paul reminds us that the Holy Spirit provides an escape from temptation and difficulty in 1 Corinthians 10:12-13.  He says, “If you think you are standing strong, be careful not to fall. 13 The temptations in your life are no different from what others experience. And God is faithful. He will not allow the temptation to be more than you can stand. When you are tempted, he will show you a way out so that you can endure.”  It’s true – he does provide a way out of the storms.   So Holy Spirit can help you set your face towards Jesus in the midst of the storm.

 The Holy Spirit acts in different ways as he lifts you up. Like wind, he purifies –  He also confirms and strengthens your inner conscience when you’re making decisions, and you choose what is right.  He acts as a refining wind, in purifying our desires for good things and not selfish ones.  One of the songs I used to sing in my Vineyard church days was the song “Refiner’s Fire.”  It goes, “Refiner’s fire. My heart’s one desire, is to be holy. Set apart for you Lord, I choose to be, holy. Set apart for you, my master, ready to do your will.” That song is a prayer to be refined by the Spirit. You can through the Spirit, and faith, use life circumstances to grow emotionally and spiritually stronger.

The Holy Spirit also points you to truth, and gives you comfort when you are sad. In John 15, Jesus called the Holy Spirit the Advocate, and the Spirit of Truth. He confirms and points to Jesus and the Father.   He is also a woo-er, as he gently wins our hearts.  He helps us grow in our trust of God. He is our source of strength. He certainly wooed me, and rather than condemn me for the evil I was doing, he just loved me and led me to Jesus.

I eventually came to faith in Jesus at a Holy Spirit conference.  It was held at a Canadian Baptist church, and this was exactly the kind of thing I was looking for during my days as a seeker.  Although I grew up in a church, it was a liberal one, and I did not know the way of salvation.  But now I did.  I let Holy Spirit guide me, like a friend, who became more, because he is God.

So I am thankful for the winds of the Holy Spirit – which can also blow strong. But that wind is pure love.  I was in Toronto during the Toronto Blessing, and remember many times when I would be on the floor for hours. It was like a force greater than myself was causing me to be still, cry, laugh and receive deep healing in my heart.  I remember Pastor John Arnott saying that a touch from God like this could do far more in one evening than months of counselling.  I’m not knocking counselling, for I have a counselling degree.  It’s a good thing.  But the wind of God can change the way you think and feel about past memories, and bring healing.  Forgiveness and love are powerful.  So in  a sense, the Holy Spirit is the REAL Cape Doctor.  I pray that this may be the case in touching the hearts of all who live in the Cape, and well beyond.

So, as you stand in the wind, will you take shelter from the winds of evil, and allow yourself to be transformed by the wind of God?  We need to set our face to seek him.  He’s not far.  He’s just a breath and a prayer away.

Lord, I ask you to open our eyes and our hearts to see and feel your presence.  Still the wind and waves of bad storms like you did with the disciples on the Sea of Galilee.  You told them to be still.  Cause us to be still, and to know you are God.  Thank you that you are there in the times of transition, when it seems what we cling to, is blowing away in the wind.  Surround us with your armour, and comfort us with your wind instead.  Help us to grow in you.

In Jesus’ name. Amen.

If you would like to hear an audio version of this talk, please visit the Ways to Grow in God podcast page on the Coppleswesterncape.ca site, or click here. Then scroll down to #26.

Blessings and love!

Laurie-Ann

 

Growing in God through (re)writing your own story

My name is Laurie-Ann, and I’m a missionary. During my mission travels, I have ministered with people in Northern Ireland, Pakistan, Canada and the USA.  I’ve also ministered in African countries like Kenya, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, South Africa and Botswana. But at this time, we live in the beautiful Western Cape of South Africa (although we are currently on furlough in eastern Ontario, and return in July 2019).

In our last four articles, we learned about the different ways that God guides us. Some of these are very supernatural (dreams, visions, impressions, angels, scripture illumination, circumstantial signs) and others more ‘ordinary’ (wise counsel and common sense).  These directive means help you to look forward in hope.  Yet you also need to remember.  Writing your dreams, goals and aspirations in a journal also helps you to look forward as you pause and reflect on your past challenges.  When you look back, that’s when you can best see how things come into place. You can celebrate having come so far!  When you re-reading your journals, it helps you gain a new perspective of past struggles, and how you came through them.  You are reminded of God’s faithfulness.  However, you do also need to learn to say goodbye to any yet-unfulfilled hopes from earlier seasons, so they don’t hold you back.  Let’s call this the ‘goodbye’ list.

I learned this when I attended my Ottawa Cursillo weekend in March 2001. I was showered with love by the community by many notes and gifts that came in unexpected ways.  But what blessed me most was the counsel of Anglican priest Andrea Thomas.  I had been grieving certain losses from my single life in Toronto, and still hadn’t fully transitioned into my married life in Ottawa.  I was somehow stuck between the two.   I shared my very real feelings with Andrea, and she told me, you need to say goodbye to those things.  You can’t say “hello” before you’ve said “goodbye.”  Andrea was right.  I wrote down the things that I was missing from my single time in Toronto.  Things ranged from the convenience of driving my own car, to University of Toronto’s library, to friends, to Tony’s wish not to have children at our ages. So, some were small losses, others big.   I wrote this list down and shared with my Anglican priest, John Bridges.  We had a funeral for the goodbyes, and during the process, we burned the list in an incense burner.  It was like the burning list of goodbyes and failed hopes were an offering to the Lord.  I finally felt free.  This list is one form of writing as a release.

Another is to journal – as a love letter to God. It’s a good way to pour out your concerns, and your prayer requests in a tangible way.  So you write these concerns down, and then read them a year later. You would be surprised how often these prayers were answered!  I journal in this way, and when I re-read my past journals, I’ve also discern a pattern through the promises that the Holy Spirit assures me with.   God has shown himself faithful – even though there are some areas that I’m still struggling with, he is still there helping transform me.

In an earlier broadcast, I shared about psalming.  Psalming is writing poems to God, similar to the style of the Psalms in the Bible.  These include complaints and praise to God, and they ultimately end with a commitment to trust God. When you write psalms, they become a promise to God that you can stand with.  And, you’ll find that Holy Spirit will answer the cries of your psalms.   Tony has written music to some of the psalms and poems written by Ottawa prison inmates. Some of these songs have become favourites with the men we see in Worcester’s Brandvlei prison.  Tony has offered to write music from their own poems.  We are hopeful for what they will share.

Yet the deepest way to grow in God through writing – is to create your own story.  In a way, writing an autobiography could be part of this process, since it’s important to look back and remember what God has done in your life.  Too often we forget the goodness we have received, and instead complain about the present.  I know it looks shocking that the Israelites forgot about the miracles that happened in Egypt, and their Red Sea crossing.  They complained about many things, and when Moses was away with God, they instead turned to a newly-made idol and worshipped it.  How quickly we forget.

So writing helps you remember the lessons of the past as you go forward into the future.

If you see your life as a developing story, rather than one chapter on continuous repeat, you can see there is a rhythm in it.   If your page at the moment features a thunderstorm, and you feel that the wind and rain are lasting forever, they are NOT.  It just seems that way.  Are you going to be defined by only one chapter or even one page?  No! There is sun in the future forecast, and there are rainbows.  All stories have their crises, nail-biting intense parts, suffering, joys, sunshine and rainstorms. Some include romantic moments, beautiful sunsets, loving families, and joys of friendship.  You can even choose the genre of your life.  You might think that you have a sad dramatic story, but you may have moments of comedy.  And then there are the moments of overcoming.   You just need to see from a different perspective.

Surpresa Sithole is a very special Iris leader.  He is the base leader of the White River base in South Africa. He also is one of the teachers at the Harvest school that we attended three years ago.  He’s a writer and encourager of many, whether Iris missionaries, conference attenders and people he happens to meet.  He’s written two books.  One of them, Voice in the Night, is his story.  It was part of our required reading for Harvest School.  I remember I stayed up all night reading his book, since I just couldn’t put it down.  I remember when I was reading, Tony came downstairs more than once calling for me, but I kept saying, “I just need to finish the chapter.”  But of course, then I would start reading the next one.

When Tony began to read Surpresa’s book, he got so excited that he went and bought five copies of the book to give others.  Eventually he gave away them all, including my original copy.  I’m thankful that I still have my e-copy!   Surpresa has a nail-biting story where he has survived so many war-time incidents in Mozambique, as well as the murder of his witchdoctor family by rival witchdoctors.   Holy Spirit spoke to him that night and commanded him to leave the house, and when he obeyed, it saved his life.  He and his best friend were led through a forest to a home on the edge of Malawi, where they came to faith. And that was just the beginning of his life of miracles that included the gift of being given at least 12 languages supernaturally – one of them being English!  He turns all of his experience to joy in the telling.  He is not one to forget what God has done for him.

So what is Supresa’s secret?  Part of it is he’s a man who worships all the time. He prays, and has a thankful attitude.  He says that every day can be a good day, no matter the circumstances.  He doesn’t let what is happening around him sway or scare him.  He is a master of what I call the “re-frame.”  Re-framing is to look at a situation from a completely different perspective.  It’s to have a different view-point.  If six people were to view an elephant at the same time, would they see the same thing?  No, they wouldn’t – because they all have their unique perspective.  One sees the legs, another, the tail, and still another, see the trunk.  But they’re all the same elephant.   Are any of them wrong?  No, they’re not wrong – they’re just not seeing the whole picture.  So, re-framing, is to see the good in a situation, or something that you can learn from that situation.  It can even provide the way out of being under that perpetual raincloud.  This is a the storyteller’s version of a promise given in 1 Corinthians 10 verse 13: God is faithful. He will not allow the temptation to be more than you can stand. When you are tempted, he will show you a way out so that you can endure.  You need to look beyond your circumstances to the big picture.  That’s what storying is all about.  You write the big stories and fill in details later.

Another way to look at seeing from a higher perspective is through a scene from the movie “Dead Poets Society.”  Robin Williams plays a teacher who wants to inspire his students to see beyond the same-old, same old that they are used to.  Instead, he encourages them to stand on their school desks to see from a new perspective, a higher perspective.  Then they could change their minds and perceptions about truth, since they could see more.  It’s the same with being given God’s perspective, and to see almost prophetically like eagles.  This perspective is above the storms of life.   And this is also another secret of Surpresa’s – having God’s perspective on life.  This gives him constant joy.

Tony and I were fortunate to sit under two teaching sessions with Surpresa, as well as an extra afternoon session where many of the single missionaries begged him to pray over them to find their future spouses.  He doesn’t do that often, but he did then, and sure enough, many of those who asked for prayer are getting married or engaged. We asked him to pray over us for languages, and hoped for Afrikaans.  But sometimes you need to just work at it, right?  We are thankful for encouraging tutors who re-frame our frustration by reminding us of the strides we have made in our learning process.  Surpesa’s master re-frame is never to forget your identity as a child of God. I remember him telling us never to be discouraged. We have so much that the world is looking for. Go as a lion, not a chicken. He knows who he is. There are people who don’t like the fact that Surpresa is always smiling or laughing – but he told us that he is always enjoying God and is worshipping him.   His story is full of joy, since his perspective is always purposed by God.  Just like praise changes the atmosphere when you sing, so seeing through God’s perspective changes the atmosphere of your life.  You begin to see God’s little touches woven through your own life.

Of course, most of us are unfinished masterpieces, but we can in time become so beautiful.   Think of an art form that the Japanese have perfected.  They take broken pieces of a ceramic cup and they glue them together with gold.  When they are finished the process, the result is even more beautiful than the original cup, before it was broken.  All that was broken has been made beautiful.  The cup’s story has been re-storied with gold, and is beautiful, for all to see.

When you are thinking about your life, think of joys, not just sorrows.  You celebrate one, and overcome the second. But there are beautiful gems in those sorrows.  Your life wouldn’t be complete without them.

Think of all the characters in the Bible. Except for Jesus, every one of them was far from perfect.   All of them sinned.  Some were proud, others hesitant and afraid. Some initially said no to God’s call, like Moses and Jonah. Some were fearful, like Gideon; however, the angel called Gideon a “mighty man of God.”  Why?  Because that’s how God was remaking him.  He does the same with us.  He changes our fears to make us fearless, although this again is a process of growing in perfect love.  Love casts out all fear. So go on a search of different biblical characters.  Is there one that resonates with you?  Learn from their story.  How did they begin?  What did God do in their hearts?   God wants to do that in you, too.

You can be a super-hero in him, just like the biblical characters.  Each of these people were great BECAUSE of the Lord.  We can point to him and give him the glory.  He’s the one who has given us gifts and talents, intelligence and creativity.  And he’s especially the one who takes our weaknesses and pours his glory through like a waterfall.

Some people look at me and think I’m a wise woman.  I’ve actually always wanted to be one.  But that wisdom doesn’t all come from me.  It comes from observing from different viewpoints:  my own, others’ stories, scriptures and whispers from God.  I’m being decorated like that cup.  I’m also filled with gold lines, as God is mending broken areas in my life.

Some of the people that Tony interviews on our internet radio show “The Worcester Reports” have overcome so much.  Their stories reflect where they have come from, and the changes and hopes that they now have in Christ.  They are being remolded into unique masterpieces.

It’s important to invite Jesus into any painful memories you may have from your childhood. When you do, he can begin to heal your heart from the inside out.  I remember one such memory that surfaced when I was on a mission trip in northern Kenya.  I had a fear of public speaking, which sounds funny for someone like me who speaks all the time. When I would give presentations during seminary classes, I would be terrified, despite really knowing the topic I shared about – so I would read my talk.

During that mission, I gave a long talk on ministry of lay people in the church.  It was a very long talk – since I didn’t take into account that it would be translated as well.  That makes the talk twice as long, or more. So our mission leader wasn’t too happy with me.  That night, I was to prepare another talk for the following day and I had a struggle.  I was terrified to prepare a talk last minute.  I still like time to prepare but the terror was evil.  I shared with the other leader who was with us, a gentle pastor from Nairobi named Tom.   We prayed about this fear and I was given a sense of where this fear came from.  I had a picture in my mind’s eye of me as a frightened little girl.  I was being scolded by an older man, who was mean.  He had attempted to molest me and told me, “Don’t tell.  Don’t ever tell. Don’t speak.”  While I had long forgiven this man, I still had been held by his curse and decree over me to not tell of the abuse, or to speak.  And what is sharing a story or teaching on the mission field?  What is preaching?  It is SPEAKING.  Thankfully, I shared this impression and memory with Tom and we prayed.  We brought Jesus into the memory.  The man was again forgiven, and the power of his curse was broken.   I was free to speak, although it took time and confidence.  The following day I shared about my emotional and spiritual healing with the audience.  Previously, not many came up for prayer.  But when I shared that I too, had been healed in this very room, from childhood sexual abuse, the women came up in tears, asking for their own healing.   God used my story and his healing to bring healing to others. God showed his glory, like the gold in the Japanese cup.  And my story was transformed from being a fearful mute to an overcoming speaker.

You too can overcome your own struggles and painful memories, just as I did, and am continuing to do.  Just open the door and let him in.

Jesus, I thank you for the journey that you’ve taken me on.  We are still re-writing my story.  You’re continuing to take threads from my past to re-weave me into a beautiful tapestry.  I ask that you do the same for my friends who are reading. Knock gently on their hearts and guide them on their journey.  Bring your healing and give them new eyes to see from a higher perspective.  Give them joy where there has been sorrow, hope where there has been despair. And fill them with your peace as they look to you.  In Jesus’ name. Amen.

If you’d like to hear a similar audio version of this article, please visit my podcast page   and scroll down to #35.

Be blessed, my friends and please visit again.

Blessings and love,
Laurie-Ann Copple

Growing in God: Learning how God guides us part 4

My name is Laurie-Ann, and I’m a missionary. During my mission travels, I have ministered with people in Northern Ireland, Pakistan, Canada and the USA.  I’ve also ministered in African countries like Kenya, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Mozambique, South Africa and Botswana. But at this time, we live in the beautiful Western Cape of South Africa.

During our last three articles, we began to learn how we can seek guidance, and some of the ways that God guides us.  The list isn’t exhaustive, but Nicky Gumbel compiles main groups of the ways under the term CSs.  These include Commanding scripture (like when scriptures come alive to us personally), and Compelling Spirit (which includes some of the many ways the Holy Spirit can speak more directly).  We were caught up in more of the supernatural ways under compelling spirit.  We can hear the still small voice of the Holy Spirit in our hearts as a whisper.  We can be given impressions, full movie-like visions, dreams, and inner knowings, which is similar to intuition.  We can be helped and strengthened by angels, and some people have even had experiences of the audible voice of God.  Some of these people include Jesus, the prophet Samuel and Heidi Baker, upon her conversion when she was 16.  Heidi shared in the Compelled by Love movie that the voice told her that she “was called to be a minister and a missionary, and she was to go to Africa, Asia and England.”

The other three CSs that Nicky Gumbel mentions in the Alpha Course are common sense, counsel of the saints (or wise, praying Christians) and circumstantial signs.  Last time we journeyed through the next two – common sense and counsel of the saints.  These two keep our feet grounded in relationships and thinking things out.  Life experience is important when considering your life’s direction.  It’s important to be naturally supernatural – remembering that we are more than a thinking mind, but also not to ignore the supernatural.  After all, God IS supernatural. We are encouraged to use our minds, although with divine inspired ideas. The Apostle Paul encouraged Timothy in 2 Timothy 2:7 to learn and grow. He told him to “think about what I am saying. The Lord will help you understand all these things.”

Just five months ago, I struggled about whether to help my parents during my mother’s illness. She was in the hospital for over a month, just as my father had been three years before that.  At that time, I left behind my volunteer work in Ottawa, to help my mother care for my dad, but also to help her, because she is frail. She still is, since normally my dad is her caregiver, despite his own health.  I reasoned out whether I should go by considering my options.  Leaving South Africa is a lot more expensive than leaving Ottawa for Toronto.  This was a big factor.  So was leaving Tony behind in the pre-Christmas season, right before school exams, where we are two of the teachers.  I also had remembered a dream that I had where I was promised that God would basically take care of my parents while we were on our mission.  So between the reasons of finances, mission work, our school and the dream, I had to trust God.  And it turned out well in the end.  Strangely enough, I got quite sick myself here in South Africa, but that’s a different matter. What kept me in South Africa, apart from the dream I had been given, came down to two things: common sense and trust in God.

The next CS is Counsel of the saints, where we seek wise mature Christians for prayerful advice.  These people could be mentors, pastors, other family members and people you are drawn to for their godly wisdom.  Proverbs 12 verse 15 reminds us that “A wise man listens to advice.”  However, Nicky Gumbel shares that while seeking advice is very important, we need to remember that ultimately, our decisions are between us and God. They are our responsibility. We cannot shift that responsibility onto others or seek to blame them if things go wrong.”  The counsel of the saints is part of guidance; but it is not the only part. Sometimes it may be right to go ahead in spite of the advice of others, particularly if there is other guidance that leads that way.

Now to the fifth CS of God’s guidance, which is Circumstantial signs.  Some people in church history have made it their ‘mantra’ to seek signs, particularly if they don’t know the other ways that God can guide us.  Signs can be surprise answers to prayer, and other times, they can seem like perfectly ordinary situations that are what you need right now.  Sometimes it’s as simple as a door opening with favour in a job search, and other times, more supernatural, like a manifestation of favour.  Some people are skeptical of obviously supernatural things like the occurrence of gold or crystal dust appearing on people during meetings, as well as gemstones and feathers.  These are signs of God’s glory, giving us a little peak into the wonderful aspects of what heaven is – creative, colourful, and beautiful.

However, signs also can be simply directional.  They point us towards the way we should go, like a signpost on the highway.   If you are driving on the N1 in the Karoo, you need to know where the next town will be.  You may need to stop for petrol and something to eat.  You are looking for a signpost, and direction on where to find what you need, without getting lost.  We need a map, a signpost, and assurance that we’re going in the right direction.  It is the same with our lives.  We plan our route, but sometimes there are a few detours.

God is in ultimate control of events. The writer of Proverbs points out in Proverbs 16:9: “In his heart a man plans his course, but the Lord determines his steps.” Sometimes God opens doors, as the Apostle Paul mentions a door of opportunity 1 Corinthians 16:9. He says, “There is a wide-open door for a great work here, although many oppose me.”  So opposition isn’t a no to a great opportunity, it’s just a challenge.  Sometimes God closes doors.  In Acts 16:7, Luke shares: Then coming to the borders of Mysia, they headed north for the province of Bithynia, but again the Spirit of Jesus did not allow them to go there. So instead, they went on through Mysia to the seaport of Troas.”

Nicky Gumbel shares in Alpha about two occasions where God firmly closed the door on something he really wanted, and he also believed at those times that it was God’s will for the doors to be open.  He said, “I tried to force the doors open. I prayed and I struggled and I fought, but they would not open.  On both occasions I was bitterly disappointed. But I understand now, years later, why God closed those doors.  Indeed, I am grateful that he did. However, I am not sure we will ever know this side of heaven why God has closed certain doors in our lives.”

I distinctly remember a door closing to me before I came to faith in Jesus Christ.  I was a semi-professional artist and was keen to work in set design and props for theatre, film and television.  After all, I was from Toronto.  Toronto was known as Hollywood North, although that term has expanded to include Vancouver as well.  Even though I had contacts, those doors slammed tighter than ever.  If my art career didn’t come to a struggle, I might not have begun seeking God as I did.

Then later, after my third attempt to start a career ended; this time in radio broadcasting, I was stuck in a hallway with closed doors. I had been told in radio school that you normally get three opportunities as a professional in that industry.  Many people struggle with the first job, which is usually in promotions, or in the studio as a board operator.  I was a board operator.  I wasn’t the best, but I was consistent and loyal, at least until the time that I had to be away while driving my then-housemate to Alberta for a new radio job.  While I was in Alberta, I visited radio stations and creative directors to gain contacts for future jobs.  After I returned, I was let go, because one of my bosses really needed me one weekend.  It didn’t matter that this was an act of kindness to another radio person, and helping another radio station in the same company.  I was devastated.  However, I found a full-time job doing what I trained for – in creative writing, audio production and scheduling of ads.  I moved across the country for this opportunity, and carried as much as I could hold in my little car.  I found a beautiful walk-in basement apartment in Nelson, British Columbia, and commuted to Castlegar, where the creative office was.

My enthusiasm and talent carried me a long way, as well as good nutrition and vitamins.  However, after a time I burned out, simply because I stayed in the station for hours and hours at a time.  The job was more than one person could handle. Although I did have help at times from a creative pool, it really was too much for one person, especially someone who was new. So after four months, I was let go.  By this time I had given up so much to be there in BC, including a bariatric by-pass surgery, since I was now in a different province.  My flat rental lease also meant that I had to stay for nearly two more months.  Then I got some beautiful referrals from a creative director I met earlier that year in Red Deer, Alberta.  He referred me to the creative director in Lloydminster, Alberta, and I applied for a vacant position as a writer.  Two months previously he referred me to another creative director in Medicine Hat in southern Alberta, but I had told this man that I didn’t think it would be fair for me to leave my new job yet.  He accepted that explanation and told me he would ask me again at another time.

Since I had glowing references and some experience, I thought I might have a chance in a job writing ads.  This job didn’t require me to schedule ads or produce; it was one position rather than three.  I could have done this – and he seemed excited about my references. This director must have dug deeply in my past jobs, because he wasn’t happy that I was let go twice within the industry.  Unfortunately, he didn’t give me that third chance that I was hoping for, and I had to move back across the country to rejoin Tony.    Upon my return, there was a job opening as an administrator in the community radio station that I had been a part of since 2001, as a volunteer radio host and audio producer.  I thought I would have a chance at that, due to my years there, over fifteen years in admin, and two years of radio school.  I was on the short list, but I didn’t come in first.  The girl who got the job apparently had more than fifteen years admin experience, although no radio school.  So the door again closed.

I spent some time in prayer and sought wise counsel from a prophetic lady, who is now part of a pastoral team at the Ottawa Vineyard.  I told her that I was still seeking radio work in some way, although I knew I would eventually return to consider full-time ministry.  She prayed and told me, “All I see are closed doors.  It’s useless continuing in this hallway – you need to seek a different direction.  Sure enough, I had further confirmation about that. Three months later, the Medicine Hat employer emailed me again and asked if I would consider working for him.  I did consider, although I had to be honest and tell him that it didn’t work out in BC.  Unfortunately, he never replied to my email, so I expected that door was indeed shut, as my pastoral friend told me.

Sometimes God opens doors in a remarkable way!  The circumstances and the timing point clearly to the hand of God (for example, Genesis 24, where Isaac’s servant was given specific directions to find his master the perfect wife for him).  He brought home Rebecca, who was smart, loving and willing to go).   Nicky Gumbel shares a special story of open doors in an unusual way.

“Michael Bourdeaux is the head of Keston College. (This is) a research unit devoted to helping believers in what were communist lands.  His work and research are respected by governments all over the world. He studied Russian at Oxford. His Russian teacher, Dr. Zernov, sent him a letter that he had received because he thought it would interest him. (This letter showed) how monks were beaten up by the KGB and subjected to inhuman medical examinations. (It showed)  how they were being rounded up in trucks and dumped many hundreds of miles away.  This letter was written very simply, with no adornment. As he read it, Michael Bourdeaux felt he was hearing the true voice of the persecuted church. The letter was signed, “Varavva and Pronina.”

In August 1964, Michael went on a trip to Moscow. On his first evening there, he met up with old friends who shared how the persecutions were getting worse.  In particular, the old church of St Peter and St Paul had been demolished. They suggested that he go and see it for himself.

So Michael took a taxi and arrived to the location at dusk.  He came to the square where he had remembered once housed a very beautiful church. He found nothing except a twelve-foot fence, which hid the rubble where the church had been. Over on the other side of the square, were two women, who were climbing over the fence to try to see what was inside.

He watched them, and when they finally left the square, he followed them for a hundred yards, and eventually caught up with them. They asked, “Who are you?”  He told them, “I am a foreigner. I have come to find out what is happening here in the Soviet Union.”  They took him back to the house of another woman who also asked him why he had come. He said he had received a letter from the Ukraine, via Paris. When she asked who it was from, he replied, “Varavva and Pronina.”  There was silence.  He wondered if he had said something wrong.  A flood of uncontrolled sobbing followed.  The woman pointed and said, “This is Varavva and this is Pronina.”

The population of Russia was over one hundred forty million.  The Ukraine, from where the letter was written, is over eight hundred miles from Moscow.  Michael Bourdeaux had flown from England six months after the letter had been written. He and the women would not have met had either party arrived at the demolished church an hour earlier or an hour later.  That was one of the ways God called him to set up his life’s work.” If you want to learn more about Michael Bourdeaux’s story, read his book “Risen Indeed.”

Sometimes we hear God correctly, but we get the timing wrong.  Don’t be in a hurry when you are seeking direction. Sometimes, God’s guidance seems to come immediately when it is asked for.  Yet often, it takes much longer – sometimes months or even years. One example of this time lapse concerns a calling I had, to go to Sierra Leone.  I was encouraged by a career missionary named Gladys, who prayed for me a year after I returned from my first mission trip in Kenya.  Gladys shared prophetically that I was to return to Africa, and I thought she meant Kenya.  But no, she meant West Africa. She asked me if I had ever heard of Sierra Leone.  This was in 1994, and I prayed into the opportunity and found that there were no current opportunities.  A few years later, Sierra Leone descended into an awful civil war.  So I put that prophetic promise on the shelf.  Later, I discovered that Tony’s spiritual mother was from Sierra Leone, I thought that was interesting, but didn’t figure that would be a future clue.

Then 11 years later, Tony tells me that he was very blessed by his first mission trip in western Kenya.  He had no idea that it would be so fulfilling to help plant the Alpha Course in Migori, Kenya.  He told me, “hey, let’s do this again. We can do this again somewhere.”  It was then that I had a word impression from the Holy Spirit.  His still, small voice told me, “Sierra Leone.”  Sure enough, in 2009, Canadian Alpha people were offered different international opportunities, and Sierra Leone was one of them.  We were to give two Alpha course conferences in the east and west ends of Freetown – the same city where Tony’s spiritual mom, Emma, lived.   A huge door opened up for us – despite circumstances that threatened to cancel our journey.  This was the Iceland volcano eruption that cancelled all flight traffic across the Atlantic for well over a week.  We eventually arrived, but that is a whole other story, where we made it despite adverse circumstances.

So, we may have a sense that God is going to do something in our lives, but have to wait a long time for the fulfillment, as it did for me going to Sierra Leone.  It took sixteen years! On these occasions, we need patience like that of Abraham. The writer of Hebrews says in Hebrews 6:15, that Abraham, “after waiting patiently … received what was promised.”  While he waited, he was tempted at one point to try and fulfill God’s promises by his own means – with disastrous results.  Just read Genesis chapters 16 and 21 and see what I mean.  Ishmael represents doing something in the wrong time and in our own strength.  Ishmael was not the planned promise.

Sometimes we hear God correctly, but we understand the timing completely wrongly.  The Holy Spirit spoke to Joseph in a dream about what would happen to him and his family in the future.  He probably expected immediate fulfillment, but he had to wait years. Instead of being promoted, he was sold into slavery, was dishonoured by his employer’s wife, and he then ended up in prison.

Indeed, while he was in prison, it must have been hard for him to believe that his dreams would ever be fulfilled. It took thirteen years after the original dream, to see God’s fulfillment. The waiting was part of the preparation. If you’re not familiar with Joseph’s story, read Genesis chapters 37 to 50.

In this area of guidance, we all make mistakes.  Waiting is HARD.  Bethel Music has a song about taking courage, where they sing “Take Courage my heart, stay steadfast my soul, He’s in the waiting.  Hold on to your hope as your triumph unfolds, He’s never failing.”  This song has given comfort to many a person trying to figure out how God will fulfill his promises.   They may believe him but are confused as to HOW and WHEN this will happen.  There is a reason why we are reminded in Proverbs 3:5-6 to  “trust in the Lord with all your heart; do not depend on your own understanding.  Seek his will in all you do, and he will show you which path to take.”  Sometimes, like Abraham, we try to fulfill God’s plans by our own wrong methods.  Or like Joseph, we get the timing wrong. Sometimes we feel that we have made too much of a mess of our lives, by the time we come to Christ, for God to do anything with us. But God is greater than that.

Joel 2:25 reminds us that God is able to “restore to you the years which the swarming locusts have eaten.  He is able to make something good out of whatever is left of our lives – whether it is a short time or a long time, if we will offer what we have to him and then cooperate with his Spirit.  It’s this same verse that gives me comfort for lost time due to my recent illness with boils, which is still ongoing. It curtails my work here in Worcester, but not completely.  God is using the circumstances to show fruit in the lives of the teens we disciple. I’m trusting that God will help us work out the details of what must be done while he’s still healing me.  Thankfully what I am able to do, is still a blessing to those we are serving.

Here’s another example from Nicky Gumbel.  Lord Radstock stayed in a hotel in Norway in the mid-nineteenth century. When he was there, he heard a little girl playing the piano down in the hallway.  She was making a terrible noise: “Plink, plunk, plink, plonk”  It was driving him mad!  Then, a man came and sat beside her at the piano bench. He began playing alongside her, and filled in the gaps.  The result was the most beautiful music!  He later discovered that the man playing alongside was the girl’s father, Alexander Borodin, the composer of the opera Prince Igor.

The Apostle Paul writes in Romans 8:28 that “in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” As we falteringly play our part, seeking his will for our lives: the Holy Spirit comes alongside us, and helps re-story our lives in the most beautiful way.   While I waited for the Iris Harvest Missions school to accept my first application, I was shown an impression that Jesus was weaving together my three dead careers: art, ministry and radio, into something beautiful.  He was taking these skills, talents as well as other abilities, and weaving them together into something unique.  It was this weaving that helped create my ministry here in South Africa – and he’s not finished the weaving.  He’s creating more and more in me, and in Tony too.  It’s all been a learning curve.

So likewise, when you are seeking guidance from God, you begin to open yourself to the ways that you can be led.  There are many, but the main ones include reading (commanding scripture), listening (compelling spirit), thinking (common sense), talking (counsel of the saints), and finally watching (circumstantial signs and waiting).  While we open our hearts, and explore these ways, God comes and sits alongside us.  Just like the composer came alongside his daughter, he works all things for our good.  He takes our plink, plonk, plink, plonk, and makes something beautiful our of our lives.

So it’s a matter of trusting him and being open to the many ways he guides us. Be still in your heart before him, for he does hear our prayers.

Lord, I ask that you will bless those who are seeking you.  Direct them in the way they should go.  Open the right doors.  Give them dreams, impressions and let them hear your still, small voice guiding them. Let them find encouragers who can give them wise advice, and figure out what they must do through good common sense. Give them confidence, hope and a spring in their step as they sense you walking with them.  In Jesus’ name, Amen.

If you missed the first three parts of this message, we have it available as podcasts on our Copples Western Cape website.   You can also take the Alpha Course.  Much of my series on God’s guidance is influenced by the talk on “How does God guide us?  This is my favourite talk on the entire course, no matter which version I’ve viewed.  If you are seeking and need to learn more about the Christian faith, please do attend an Alpha Course. You won’t be sorry.

As for our podcasts, you can visit audio versions of this talk (and many others) at the WTGIG podcast page on Coppleswesterncape.ca.  Scroll down to podcasts 44, 45, 46 and 47.  It’s free, although we gratefully receive any free-will donations through the Iris Ministries Canada Canada Helps portal.  We are missionaries who live entirely by faith, with the exception of my husband’s pension.  God does supply our needs through surprising ways.

I hope that you’ve been blessed by this message and other articles as well.  Please do share with me if this has impacted you.

Blessings,
Laurie-Ann